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With 30 percent of Americans still denying global warming exists, and at least some still denying Barack Obama is an American citizen, it is striking that basic facts can become so contested. David Roberts, for Vox, says America is in the midst of an epistemic crisis. One advanced, he argues, by Trumpism’s rejection of mainstream institutions devoted to gathering and disseminating knowledge.

In such an atmosphere, one wonders, even if Trump is found to be guilty of collusion with Russia whether, ultimately, those facts will matter. But this isn’t a new phenomenon. Americans have been engaged in dubious interpretation and disregard of facts for as long as schools have been teaching children that the pilgrims and the Indians were friendly co-collaborators and glossed over the raw horrors of the slave trade.

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Who said you need to go to a museum to see good art?

There’s a growing amount of it on view, for free, in the streets of the tri-county metropolitan area.

The Charleston peninsula boasts the highest concentration of murals, but painted exteriors can be found in North Charleston, West Ashley, Mount Pleasant, James Island, Folly Beach and elsewhere.

The king of the American muralists, Shepard Fairey, is a Charleston native now living in Los Angeles who has developed the Obey empire whose mascot is Andre the Giant. In 2014, the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art brought him home for a two-part art show. Framed works were displayed in the gallery. But Fairey also braved the heat and humidity to paint four murals in the city, three of which survive.

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Halsey Symposium Examines the ‘New South’

Tue Jan 08, 2019
The College Today

Say this phrase out loud: “The new south.” Now ponder what it means to you. It’s likely that your interpretation of those words differs from that of your co-workers, peers or relatives. That’s because the phrase has become nearly ubiquitous with meanings that shift to suit the perspective of whoever utters it.

This month, and until March 2, 2019, you’ll find photographic interpretations of the “New South” on display at the College’s Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art and Charleston’s City Gallery at Waterfront Park in the Halsey’s exhibit, “Southbound: Photographs of and About the New South.” And that phrase will come into sharp focus on Friday and Saturday, Jan. 11-12, 2019, when the Halsey co-hosts “Public Memory in the New South” – a symposium designed to examine what we remember and forget in this region and how we choose to frame those recollections in order to arrive at a collective sense of identity in today’s South.

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Laurinburg native’s work to be shown in national exhibit

Mon Jan 07, 2019
The Laurinburg Exchange

A Laurinburg, N.C., native’s work will be a part of the largest exhibition ever produced for photographs of and about the American South in the 21st century.

McNair Evans grew up in Laurinburg and his work is being featured in “Southbound: Photographs of and about the New South” by the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art in Charleston, South Carolina. Southbound will feature the work of 56 artists.

The exhibition features artwork that shows the region through different lenses that may bring into focus the New South and it’s representations of the world around it. The curators contacted artists who had taken photos in the south since 2000 to use their work in the project. The pieces selected from Evans are part of a series he did in 2009-10.

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Life in the US south is the focus of a major exhibition at the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art in Charleston. Featuring works by 56 photographers it challenges perceptions of the southern states at a time of change. Southbound runs until 2 March

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Last year the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art, in conjunction with the City Gallery, presented a far-reaching exhibition, Southbound, that called into question the term ‘New South’ through the work of over 50 photographers.

In his cover story on the exhibit, which opened in October and will be on display through this March, writer Chase Quinn asked, “What are we actually talking about when we talk about the New South, a term bandied about with the same frequency (and often the same conceit) with which people label Charleston ‘quietly progressive’?”

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The year 2018 has come and gone, and in the blink of an eye, hundreds of art exhibits passed us by in Charleston.

Hung and unhung from gallery walls all across town were some diverse and provocative displays, from P-Nut’s poetic legacy shown and celebrated at the Charleston County Library to Camela Guevara’s “Care Works” embroidery exhibit at Redux, still available for viewing through Jan. 12.

Among some of the artwork that remains are long-term exhibits at the Gibbes Museum and the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art at the College of Charleston.

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BURNAWAY’s Best of 2018

Fri Dec 28, 2018
BURNAWAY

As the year comes to a close, BURNAWAY Executive Director Erin Jane Nelson and Editor Logan Lockner reflect on their favorite exhibitions in the South in 2018. Stay tuned for BA’s preview of 2019 next week.

“Southbound” at the Halsey Institute for Contemporary Art, Charleston
October 19, 2018 – March 2, 2019

The South has been a veritable Mecca for photography since the beginnings of the medium, and Southerners have been some of the leading contributors to the photography’s growth over the last century. “Southbound” makes the convincing case that the region is still a leader of photography globally by surveying not only exciting young upstarts like Sheila Pree BrightSusan Worsham, and Tommy Kha but also acknowledging artists like Burk UzzleAlex Harris, and Lucinda Bunnen who have been working in the region for decades. — EJN

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It’s not easy to summarize a year in arts in Charleston, nor is it easy to pick out a few events, exhibits, and interviews that stand out in a sea of stories. This list is neither comprehensive, nor ordered in any particular fashion. It’s just what we remember best about the arts scene of 2018 based on our gut reactions to works of art, people, and places. These exhibits, films, and comedians made us cry, scream, and laugh (in no particular order) all year. Here’s why: 

An exhibition four years in the making (and still going on — check it out through March 2 2019),

Southbound is impressive in both its scope and in its message. Featured in two galleries, the exhibition, which opened at the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art and City Gallery this fall, looks at “photographs of and about the New South,” through the eyes of 56 artists and photographers. In our October 2018 cover story on the expansive art exhibit, writer Chase Quinn asked, “What are we actually talking about when we talk about the New South, a term bandied about with the same frequency (and often the same conceit) with which people label Charleston ‘quietly progressive?'” Quinn discovered that the term “New South” has actually been used since the 1880s, begging more questions than answers when it comes to the progress of the Southern region of the United States. From portraits of men and women in poverty-stricken areas of the country to candids of groups of folks celebrating their versions of the South, Southbound is deeply powerful, and continually important. Join in the conversation with a wide variety of screenings and discussions, held at the Halsey. Check out the full schedule online at halsey.cofc.edu.

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College of Charleston Photos of the Week

Fri Nov 23, 2018
The College Today

Take a look around the College of Charleston campus before the Thanksgiving break.

Women’s and Gender Studies hosted an event for its oral history project.
Southbound artist Gillian Laub visited Alternative Processes Photography class students.

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