Free For All
GALLERY HOURS (during exhibitions)
Thursday & Friday, 11am – 4pm
EDU BLOG
A common theme throughout Moon’s collection is a juxtaposition of American and East Asian cultures. As the essay points out, the work may appear to be Asian yet is focused on America. A prime example of this is the use of fortune cookies, something people frequently associate with Chinese food, yet rarely appears outside of the United States. In her work, it seems she examines American projections and assumptions of exoticism by taking common tropes, such as the Chinese takeout box and the fortune cookie, and using those as a medium and a vehicle to display Korean folklore and symbolism. 
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Dr. Fahamu Pecou, an Atlanta based artist who focuses on the Black male in America, speaks to the notion of home through his grav·i·ty series (2013-2014). Pecou encourages the viewer to reflect upon fashion as an art form and how it connects with Black American culture. Additionally, with the artistic use of dress and style, one can express their character, culture, and history. In other words, dress can represent a piece of home.
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Birds, women, symbols of celebration, symbols of Chinese communism and at its core an uncertainty involving one’s self. Hung Liu’s work defies time with clashes of China’s rapid modernisation and desperate push against the past. Depictions of traditional Chinese art and culture are juxtaposed with bright slashes of red - a symbol of celebration in China and yet a harsh reminder of the communist rule and the bloodshed during the Civil War that displaced Liu. 
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Wrote the poet John Ashbery, “The room I entered was a dream of this room. / Surely all those feet on the sofa were mine.” It is this uncanny merging of past and present, this sense of déjà vu, that lends Tanja Softić’s Night Blooms series its unique power. In Softić’s work, present and future grow out of the past: remnants of previous eras are visible everywhere, memory mixes with present experience, and the motion of time is not linear, but a series of superimpositions. Should we dig through the new growth of any present, or any budding future, we will find a past beneath it: a past, for Softić, that contains the memory of a lost homeland.
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For the 2019 exhibition Linked, the Halsey Institute commissioned a short film on artist Colin Quashie. Madeleine Mitchell introduces it here.
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For her 2019 exhibition, Over There and Here is Me and Me, Katrina Andry used for research a report called The State of Racial Disparities in Charleston County, South Carolina 2000-2015, written by Dr. Stacey Patton for the Race and Social Justice Initiative at the College of Charleston. Anna Crowley profiles it here.
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For her 2019 exhibition Cry Joy Park–Gardens of Dark and Light, Jennifer Wen Ma created a series of community dinners called An Invitation to the Feast, held in the exhibition. Madelayne Abel writes about them here.
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This week’s art activity of 10/10—Reflections on a Decade of Exhibitions is the last in this series. We’re taking a closer look at Cry Joy Park—Gardens of Dark and Light, a solo exhibition by artist Jennifer Wen Ma, which examines issues of social justice and the difficulty of reconciling opposing forces in our society. The balance of light and dark reminds us that we need both utopian and dystopian qualities in society. For this simple at-home project, we encourage readers to learn more about the balance of light and dark !
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On Thursday, August 13, we hosted a virtual studio visit with Marc Trujillo on Facebook Live. Check out this blog post to view a recording of it in its entirety.
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An entirely virtual exhibition, 10/10–Reflections on a Decade of Exhibitions celebrates ten years of exhibitions, partnerships, and programs produced in the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art's current gallery space inside the Marion and Wayland H. Cato Jr. Center for the Arts at the College of Charleston. We are spending summer 2020 taking a look back on the adventurous artists we’ve hosted and projects we’ve produced in that time. Over ten weeks, we will be taking a deep dive into each year, featuring blog posts on exhibitions, interviews with artists, and other explorations into the Halsey Institute’s past.
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Free For All
GALLERY HOURS (during exhibitions)
Thursday & Friday, 11am – 4pm
843.953.4422


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