Free For All
GALLERY HOURS (during exhibitions)
Thursday & Friday, 11am – 4pm
EDU BLOG
Hamid Rahmanian hoped to tell stories that created a different narrative about Iran and the Middle East. “Once you come here [to America], as an immigrant from a Muslim country, you realize that you are basically under attack; your culture, your self, everything you know about your past…and you know that you have a lot to offer to humanity, but it’s all under attack. Everything you hear about us is all negative. It’s all about issues.” Rahmanian hoped to use his creativity to tell a different narrative and did so by making four successful films while in Iran, but felt like an outsider in while in his native home, in addition to the United States.
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For his work in "Dis/placements: Revisitations of Home," artist Shimon Attie says the images he creates reflect where home might be, but also what home might mean. A big part of his work is searching for home, whether as a literal place or a metaphor. “Home can be inside of me. Home can be my sense of self. Home can be my family. Home can be where I live. Home can be where ancestors of mine once lived, once fled.”
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We asked our intern Allston Allison to complete one of the activities in our Teaching Resource packet created for the "Dis/placements: Revisitations of Home" virtual project. Allston chose this prompt: “Shape House: Provide an assortment of construction paper shapes: squares, triangles, rectangles, and circles. Have children glue a variety of shapes onto a large piece of construction paper to create shape houses. Ask them to describe their final project."
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Believing painting to be more about the process than the result, Riccarda de Eccher likes to provide the viewer with the least amount of message as possible while portraying what she wants to. She enjoys painting as large as possible, feeling that a smaller size would diminish the grandiosity of her subject. Watercolor is her paint of choice and is usually seen as a light and airy medium, yet she manages to provide both a serene and majestic feel to her body of work.
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"The Line Becomes A River" by Francisco Cantú, combines memoir with history, anthropology, and sociology to paint a full portrait of what the US-Mexico border means as both a place and a concept. Selected as this year’s College Reads book for the College of Charleston, "The Line Becomes A River" touches upon themes of displacement, as various characters move across borders in search of finding home again. Cantú writes with a lot of empathy and honesty, and some may say this memoir is an atonement for his time spent with the border patrol. In the author’s note, he notes that small impulses and interactions can begin to rehumanize people and systems. Although the book has been met with some controversy, it touches upon very important themes that are also conveyed through the work in our current virtual exhibition, "Dis/placements: Revisitations of Home."
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With a notebook constantly at his side, [Yaakov Israel] writes new ideas down and pursues the ones that continuously resurface, drawing inspiration from literature, film, and his surroundings. His first serious project was about the working-class neighborhoods of Southwest Jerusalem, the area that he grew up in, which combines interests he has in urban landscapes, and the idea that the residents of said neighborhoods maintain the city.
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We asked our intern Marian Williams to complete one of the activities in our Teaching Resource packet created for the "Dis/placements: Revisitations of Home" virtual project. Marian chose this prompt: “Out in the Open: Create a series of four or five photographs to document a facet of your community usually kept out of view that you want to bring to attention. For example, you might identify police searching or interrogating young people in your neighborhood, restaurant workers who work in kitchens behind closed doors, or domestic workers who clean offices and private homes. Consider why the activities portrayed in your photos are often done out of view. Why is it important for you to bring this out into the open? Record your opinion in an artist statement to share alongside your photographs.”
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Over the next few weeks, we invite readers to try some of the suggested activities from our Displacements Education packet, a resource meant for children and adults to utilize either at home or in the classroom. This week’s activity is a paper bag house and is suitable for children ages three and older.
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We asked our intern Marian Williams to complete one of the activities in our Teaching Resource packet created for the Dis/placements: Revisitations of Home virtual project. Marian chose this prompt: "Describe and Draw It: Think about your home, your neighborhood, and your community. If you drew everything that came to your head, what would you be drawing right now?"
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A common theme throughout Moon’s collection is a juxtaposition of American and East Asian cultures. As the essay points out, the work may appear to be Asian yet is focused on America. A prime example of this is the use of fortune cookies, something people frequently associate with Chinese food, yet rarely appears outside of the United States. In her work, it seems she examines American projections and assumptions of exoticism by taking common tropes, such as the Chinese takeout box and the fortune cookie, and using those as a medium and a vehicle to display Korean folklore and symbolism. 
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Free For All
GALLERY HOURS (during exhibitions)
Thursday & Friday, 11am – 4pm
843.953.4422

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