Free For All
GALLERY HOURS (during exhibitions)
Monday – Saturday, 11am – 4pm
Open until 7pm on Thursdays
EDU BLOG
This blog post is the second of two featuring books in the Halsey Institute’s Biblioteca that connect with themes explored in the current exhibitions, Butch Anthony: Inside/Out and Coulter Fussell: The Raw Materials of Escape.
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I was involved with installing Coulter Fussell’s exhibition The Raw Materials of Escape, and I had a lot of fun. Katie Hirsch, the curator, carefully thought out where each quilt should be placed to make a cohesive and aesthetically pleasing exhibition. She also told me that we would usually use gloves to protect the artwork, but with Fussell’s special permission we were allowed to handle her artwork with our bare hands. I never thought that I would be allowed to touch the artwork in a gallery on my first day. Feeling the textures of each textile and seeing how she stitched her artwork was an incredible experience.
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Harrod’s Dream

Thu Feb 06, 2020
Looking around the gallery, I was in awe by the variety of mixed media present in Butch Anthony’s work. Among portraits from the American antebellum era and an assemblage of animal bones and taxidermy birds, I quickly found myself caught up by how much there was to take in. One piece in particular, however, truly caught my eye. Harrod’s Dream, 2019, located towards the back of the Halsey Institute not only combines many visual components of what Anthony’s work embodies but also features an audio monologue element.
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This blog post is the first of two featuring books in the Halsey Institute’s Biblioteca that connect with themes explored in the current exhibitions, Butch Anthony: Inside/Out and Coulter Fussell: The Raw Materials of Escape. With more than 180 fascinating photographs, Cabinets of Wonder includes ample text that examines the history of these curiously odd cabinets, as well as the motivations of some of their collectors to understand the world around them.
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Questioning entrenched assumptions about what art should be and how it is made is a practice long held by many artists and spectators. Marcel Duchamp revolutionized the idea of art in the beginning of the 20th century with readymade items presented as works of art. Readymades are ordinary manufactured objects that the artist selected and modified, and by simply choosing objects and repositioning it, the Found object became art.
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This blog post is the second of two that features books in the Halsey Institute’s Biblioteca that connect with themes explored in the current exhibitions, Katrina Andry: Over There and Here is Me and Me and Colin Quashie: Linked. The selected texts for today’s post both coincide well with Katrina Andry’s Over There and Here is Me and Me as one portrays life in her native New Orleans as a person of color, and the other examines the effects of gentrification on an urban environment.
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Artist Colin Quashie’s exhibition Linked serves the purpose of making connections between historical and contemporary images. He does so by taking both historical and contemporary images and overlaying them with items referring to slavery and dating back to the Antebellum period. One piece in particular catches my eye. Gabriel, one of Quashie’s pieces, is a representation of Jazz artist Louis Armstrong. Trumpet in hand, Armstrong appears to be playing his heart out. Quashie has placed an image of dated, rusted shackles over Armstrong’s instrument, and oddly enough, the shackles resemble the shape of a trumpet quite clearly. Here, Quashie makes a visual connection between slavery and the jazz style.
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Growing up in Washington, DC, I was never particularly exposed to what southern culture truly looks like. I never came home to the smell of my mom cooking fried chicken in the kitchen, I was never told to eat my collard greens, and I had never tasted okra, but that all changed when I came to Charleston. Having lived in Charleston for three years now, I have been able to immerse myself into the southern culture, and though I have loved every minute of it, there was a part of me still longing for “soul food.” I wanted to find that buttery fried chicken, and those perfectly salted collard greens, and after seeing Katrina Andry’s You and You Is Us installation in her exhibition Over There and Here is Me and Me, there was a specific image that stood out to me that answered my calling for soul food. In Andry’s collage, she photographed specific Charleston monuments, libraries, statues, buildings, and one of Charleston’s favorite soul food restaurants, “Eastside Soul Food.”
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Today’s blog post is the first of two that features books in the Halsey Institute’s Biblioteca that connect with themes explored in the current exhibitions, Katrina Andry: Over There and Here is Me and Me and Colin Quashie: Linked. The selected texts for today’s post both coincide well with Colin Quashie’s Linked as they all explore themes of race, politics, and culture, and encourage a visual conversation amongst viewers. Each body of work brings issues to the surface that some may choose not to consider or discuss, while taking a closer look at stereotypes as they exist today.
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Katrina Andry’s work, Mammy Complex: Unfit Mommies Make for Fit Nannies, and Colin Quashie’s Blactose Tolerant explore contradictions within our cultural conception of Black motherhood. As the first works that greet the audience in the exhibition, these images introduce the show with probing questions of how Black motherhood is understood. While the rest of the artists’ images branch off into distinct forms of analysis, the preliminary line of questioning introduced in the show pertains to a contradictory dualism, or as Andry calls it, a “Mammy Complex.” Black women in America have historically served as caretakers for white children while being perceived as incapable mothers for their own children, a stereotype that persists today. Whereas Quashie constructs a historical comment on the link between the nurturing of white children and the figure of the Black nanny with superimposed images, Andry explores this issue in a contemporaneous context far more indirectly with narrative woodcut prints.
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Free For All
GALLERY HOURS (during exhibitions)
Monday – Saturday, 11am – 4pm
Open until 7pm on Thursdays
843.953.4422


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