Free For All
GALLERY HOURS (during exhibitions)
Monday – Saturday, 11am – 4pm
Open until 7pm on Thursdays

HALSEY TALKS | The Unknown Unknowns

Tuesday, February 13, 2018
6:30PM
Halsey Institute Galleries

To curator Anthony Huberman, an artist may just be a Blind man in a dark room looking for a black cat that isn’t there. How do artists help reveal the things we don’t know we don’t know? What are the limits of our knowledge—and is it possible to expand them?

Artists have been keen to explore the limits of our perception. Marcel Duchamp’s investigation of the infrathin—or that which we cannot perceive but only imagine—is one effort. How do artists continue to break through these limits to increase our knowledge and experience of the world around us? For this discussion, we will look at the work of artists who either locate our limits of knowledge or try to break through them. The talk is free and open to the public, and students, teachers, artists, philosophers, art-enthusiasts, and art-unenthusiasts are welcome to attend.

About Halsey Talks

Halsey Talks are an ongoing series of roundtable discussion on intriguing concepts in art. While they may take advantage of exhibitions on view at the Halsey Institute, the are open-ended in nature. As a platform for a deeper understanding and discussion of fascinating ideas in art, Halsey Talks are open to all.

Reading list:

Errol Morris “The Anosognosic’s Dilemma: Something’s Wrong but You’ll Never Know What It Is.” https://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/06/20/the-anosognosics-dilemma-1/

HALSEY TALKS | The Unknown Unknowns

Tuesday, February 13, 2018
6:30PM
Halsey Institute Galleries

RACE AND THE AFTERLIFE OF SLAVERY | A lecture by Matthew Pettway

Tuesday, February 20, 2018
6:00PM
Halsey Institute Galleries

In this talk, Dr. Matthew Pettway will explore how nearly four hundred years of Spanish colonialism and African enslavement invented the myth of white supremacy and nurtured the creation of another fiction, black inhumanity.  The emphasis of his talk will be to define the power of antiracist thinking and to look toward the philosophical contributions of the formerly enslaved (and their descendants) in an effort to build a society based on democratic praxis. Dr. Pettway’s talk will provide context for the exhibition Roberto Diago: La historia recordada.

About Matthew Pettway

Matthew Pettway is a post-doctoral fellow in The School of Languages, Cultures and World Affairs at the College of Charleston where he teaches Spanish and Latin American and Caribbean Studies.  Dr. Pettway completed his doctorate in Hispanic Cultural Studies at Michigan State University in 2010.  He has taught at Bates College and the University of Kansas in Spanish and Latin American Studies.  At Bates College, he was also affiliated with the African-American Studies program.  This semester, Dr. Pettway is teaching a course on the rich cultural and intellectual contributions of black Cubans in film, fine arts, literature and history.

His book manuscript, tentatively entitled Black Cuban Literature in the Age of Conspiracy:  Juan Francisco Manzano and Gabriel de la Concepción Valdés is under contract with the University Press of Mississippi.  In it, Pettway argues that black poets used the symbolic language of Catholicism, Romanticism and Neoclassicism to represent African-inspired ideas of spirit and cosmos beneath the surface of the dominant aesthetic.  

RACE AND THE AFTERLIFE OF SLAVERY | A lecture by Matthew Pettway

Tuesday, February 20, 2018
6:00PM
Halsey Institute Galleries

BOOK RELEASE PARTY | empath by Marcus Amaker, featuring Burke High School students

Thursday, February 22, 2018
5:00PM
Halsey Institute Galleries

Marcus Amaker is Charleston, SC’s first Poet Laureate and an award-winning graphic designer. He will celebrate his latest book and album, empath, with a spirited reading of new work infused with music.

The event will also feature readings from the Burke High School student poetry club.

Find out more about Marcus Amaker here.

BOOK RELEASE PARTY | empath by Marcus Amaker, featuring Burke High School students

Thursday, February 22, 2018
5:00PM
Halsey Institute Galleries

TAMARA REYNOLDS | MEET THE MAKER

Tuesday, February 27, 2018
5:30-7:30PM
Halsey Institute Galleries

Artist presentation begins at 6:00pm. 

This lecture is part of our Meet the Maker series for Postmodernist members and above. To join our membership program, please visit here or call 843-953-5652.

Tamara Reynolds is a Nashville-based photographer whose work seeks to peer below the stereotyped surface of the South. Reynolds is one of the fifty-six photographers featured in the upcoming exhibition Southbound: Photographs of and about the New South. Her series Southern Route, a four-year project that took her throughout the American South, is featured in Southbound. In this series, Reynolds explores the South through back roads and across railroad tracks in a quest to resolve her own conflicted feelings about the region she’s long called home.

Reynolds’s work can be found in the collections of the Do Good Fund, Vanderbilt Divinity College, and Cheekwood Fine Art Center, among others. She earned a BFA from Middle Tennessee State University and is presently pursuing her MFA from Hartford University Photographic International Limited Residency Program. 

Learn more about Reynolds on her website.

TAMARA REYNOLDS | MEET THE MAKER

Tuesday, February 27, 2018
5:30-7:30PM
Halsey Institute Galleries

CURATOR & ARTIST-LED GALLERY TALK | Roberto Diago: La historia recordada

Thursday, March 1, 2018
6:00PM
Halsey Institute Galleries

Co-curator Katie McCampbell, Curatorial Associate & Manager of Traveling Exhibitions, and exhibiting artist Roberto Diago will lead visitors through La historia recordada.

This event is presented in conjunction with Roberto Diago: La historia recordada, on view from January 19 – March 3, 2018. Born in 1971 in Havana, Roberto Diago’s work is often a direct criticism of racism in Cuba and explores the roots and role of slavery in Cuban history and culture.

To learn more about the exhibition and see images, click here.

“La historia recordada” is part of a much larger college-wide interdisciplinary project with a focus on Cuba entitled Cuba en el Horizonte that will include special topics courses, lectures, and performances across departments of the College of Charleston. The Halsey Institute’s exhibition will be the focal point for this semester-long engagement with Cuban culture, politics, history, economics, and its potential future. 

For more information on Cuba en el Horizonte, click here.

In conjunction with the exhibition, Juan Carlos Alom’s 16mm black-and-white short film, “Habana Solo” (2000), will be shown in the Halsey Institute microcinema. Habana Solo is a multi-sensory portrait of the city of Havana, Cuba. The film features improvised musical solos by Cuban musicians tasked with translating the city they inhabit into sound. The musical solos are paired with abstracted footage of the city landscape, making palpable the very spirit and essence of Havana.

This exhibition is funded in part by the National Endowment for the Arts.

CURATOR & ARTIST-LED GALLERY TALK | Roberto Diago: La historia recordada

Thursday, March 1, 2018
6:00PM
Halsey Institute Galleries

SUBMISSION DAY | Young Contemporaries 2018

Friday, March 9, 2018
10:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Halsey Institute Galleries

Submission day for Young Contemporaries 2018 is March 9, 2018 at the Halsey Institute. All College of Charleston Fall 2017/Spring 2018 students and December graduates are eligible to submit work! Each student may submit up to 3 works per medium (for example, submitting 3 paintings and 3 drawings is allowed).

SUBMISSION DAY

Friday, March 9, 10am-5pm

Works must be dropped off at the Halsey Institute (in Cato Center for the Arts, 161 Calhoun Street) during this time. You must be present with your artwork in order to sign off on the Conditions for Submitting contract.

WHO IS ELIGIBLE?

CofC Fall 2017/Spring 2018 Students including December 2018 graduates.

HOW TO REGISTER

Original artwork completed between April 2017 – March 2018. Students may submit up to three pieces per artist, per medium (prints, sculptures, etc.).

Students must obtain yellow labels from the Studio Art Office (Simons Center, 4th Floor) or by downloading it from our website here.)

Fill out labels legibly and attach to the back of EVERY artwork submitted.

Indicate on the label if there are any special installation instructions.

Bring eligible work to the Halsey Institute on Friday, March 9, 10am-5pm. You must bring your own work yourself.

Oversized work must also be registered at this time, even if it will be delivered later. Indicate on the registration form if you have oversized work, where it is located, and attach a picture or photocopy of it.

ALL WORK MUST BE DRY!

IMPORTANT DATES

SUBMISSION DEADLINE

Friday March 9, 10am-5pm, Halsey Institute

JUROR’S LECTURE WITH AMY YOES

Wednesday, March 14, 6pm, Simons Room 309

Free and open to the public

ACCEPTED WORKS ANNOUNCED

Thursday, March 15, Halsey Institute

OPENING RECEPTION AND ARTIST AWARDS CEREMONY

Thursday, March 29, 5-7pm

Artist awards ceremony at 6pm

EXHIBITION DATES

March 29 – April 28, 2018

ARTIST TALKS

Saturday, April 7, 2pm, Halsey Institute

QUESTIONS?

Contact Bryan Granger, Manager of Exhibitions and Public Programs, at grangerbw@cofc.edu.

To print this out in PDF format, click here.

For labels to affix to your artwork, click here.

 

SUBMISSION DAY | Young Contemporaries 2018

Friday, March 9, 2018
10:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Halsey Institute Galleries

JUROR LECTURE BY AMY YOES | Young Contemporaries 2018

Wednesday, March 14, 2018
6:00PM
Simons Center for the Arts, Room 309

Join us for the Juror Lecture with Amy Yoes for Young Contemporaries 2018 on March 14, 6:00PM in Room 309 of the Simons Center for the Arts. Yoes has been selected as juror for the 2018 version of Young Contemporaries. In this lecture, she will discuss her own creative practice.

About Amy Yoes

Amy Yoes was born in 1959 and grew up in Houston, Texas. She has lived in Chicago, San Francisco and, since 1998, in New York.

She works in a multi-faceted way, alternately employing installation, photography, video, painting, and sculpture. An interest in decorative language and architectural space permeates all of her work. She responds to formal topologies of ornament and style that have reverberated through time, informing our mutually constructed visual and cultural memory. 

Her videos have been seen in many venues, including the National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC.; MassMoca, North Adams, MA; and the Wexner Center for the Arts, Columbus, Ohio. She has held residences at the Maison Dora Maar, Ménerbes, France; AIR, Krems, Austria; McDowell, Peterborough, NH; Yaddo, Saratoga Springs, NY; and The British School at Rome, Italy. She has been a visiting artist at many institutions, including the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, University of Las Vegas Nevada, Maryland Institute College of Art, and the Siena Art Institute. Recent projects include a site specific animation installation at the Sullivan Galleries at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and a new animation for a screening at the National Gallery of Art.

JUROR LECTURE BY AMY YOES | Young Contemporaries 2018

Wednesday, March 14, 2018
6:00PM
Simons Center for the Arts, Room 309

A HALSEY & MCCALLUM CELEBRATION

Wednesday, March 14, 2018
7:00PM
Recital Hall, Simons Center for the Arts, 54 St Philip Street | This event is open to all CofC students and Halsey Institute members.

Join the Halsey Institute Family to honor the contributions and talents of two Elizabeth O’Neil Verner Award winners, Corrie McCallum (1914-2009) and our namesake, William Halsey (1915-1999). We will introduce a new generation of Charlestonians to this couple’s pioneering spirit through a series of brief presentations illustrating their progressive artmaking against the backdrop of traditional Charleston. After the discussions, join us for a reception with sweet treats from Wattle & Daub–a festive celebration of Corrie and William! 

This event is open to all College of Charleston students and Halsey Institute members. Memberships begin at $40 for individuals, $20 for K-12 educators, and $17.70 for CofC students. Click here to join!

RSVP here! 

Presenters include:

Mark Sloan, director and chief curator of the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art
Brian Rutenberg, former student of William Halsey and renowned painter
Caroline Wright, William Halsey scholar
Pam Wall, curator of exhibitions at the Gibbes Museum of Art
Louise Halsey, artist and youngest daughter of Corrie McCallum and William Halsey

 

In addition to her vast body of work, Corrie McCallum made significant contributions to the Charleston art community as an educator. She was the first artist to teach printmaking at the College of Charleston. Under her guidance, the Gibbes Museum of Art conducted the first comprehensive art appreciation program for Charleston County public school students. She held education positions at several institutions, including the Telfair Museum of Art in Savannah and the Gibbes Museum of Art, College of Charleston, and Newberry College in South Carolina. Throughout her life she remained an outspoken advocate for the visual arts.

 William Halsey dedicated his life to art and art education in South Carolina. A 1939 graduate of the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, he garnered professional success in Charleston, Savannah, New York, and Mexico. He established the College of Charleston’s studio art program in 1964 and served as assistant professor and artist-in-residence for nearly two decades. His leadership and artistic vision inspired the faculty at the College of Charleston to name the College’s art gallery in his honor upon his retirement. 

Today, the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art promulgates its namesake’s vision by introducing the work of emerging, mid-career, and oddly overlooked artists. The life and work of William Halsey and Corrie McCallum continue to inspire young artists, and their legacy remains precious to their three children, Paige Halsey Slade, David Ashley Halsey, and Louise McCallum Halsey.

 

Sweet treats provided by Wattle & Daub

A HALSEY & MCCALLUM CELEBRATION

Wednesday, March 14, 2018
7:00PM
Recital Hall, Simons Center for the Arts, 54 St Philip Street | This event is open to all CofC students and Halsey Institute members.

OPENING RECEPTION | Young Contemporaries 2018

Thursday, March 29, 2018
5:00 - 7:00PM
Halsey Institute Galleries

Join us on Thursday, March 29, 5:00-7:00PM for the opening of Young Contemporaries 2018, our 33rd Annual Juried Student Exhibition.

Awards will be presented at 6:00PM.


In what has become a venerable tradition at the College of Charleston, the Halsey Institute of Contemporary presents Young Contemporaries 2018. Now in its 33rd year, the exhibition features work by College of Charleston students juried by a nationally prominent juror. The exhibition reflects the strength and diversity of practice in the School of the Arts’ rigorous programs. Featuring a wide range of media—including paintings, sculpture, photography, and prints—the exhibition showcases the talent of the student body at the College. For 2018, Amy Yoes will serve as the juror.

Concurrent with Young Contemporaries will be the Salon des Refusés exhibition, showing in the Hill Exhibition Gallery within The Marion and Wayland H. Cato Jr. Center for the Arts. The origin of the Salon des Refusés dates to Paris in 1863, when artists who had been rejected from the official Salon caused such a protest that Emperor Napoleon III ordered another exhibition held for them. Among the painters in this Salon des Refusés were Camille Pissaro, Henri Fantin-Latour, James M. Whistler, and Edouard Manet.

OPENING RECEPTION | Young Contemporaries 2018

Thursday, March 29, 2018
5:00 - 7:00PM
Halsey Institute Galleries

HALSEY TALKS | The Educational Turn in Art

Tuesday, April 3, 2018
6:30PM
Halsey Institute Galleries

In 1818, Joseph Jacotot, a French professor, determined to teach his native language at the University of Louvain in the Netherlands. Many of his students spoke only Flemish; Jacotot knew only French. How could he teach these students his native language without being able to speak to them?

His solution was to use a text translated into both French and Flemish, and in doing so, he proved that a teacher can teach something that they don’t know. With his pedagogical experiment, Jacotot distinguished the difference between “knowledge replication” and “knowledge production.”

How does this story show us how museums and exhibitions can be sites of knowledge production? Let’s talk about it, and we will use Jacque Ranciere’s The Ignorant Schoolmaster and Irit Rogoff’s Turning to bolster our discussion. The talk is free and open to the public, and students, teachers, artists, philosophers, art-enthusiasts, and art-unenthusiasts are welcome to attend.

About Halsey Talks

Halsey Talks are an ongoing series of roundtable discussion on intriguing concepts in art. While they may take advantage of exhibitions on view at the Halsey Institute, the are open-ended in nature. As a platform for a deeper understanding and discussion of fascinating ideas in art, Halsey Talks are open to all.

Link for Turning: http://www.e-flux.com/journal/00/68470/turning/#_edn1

HALSEY TALKS | The Educational Turn in Art

Tuesday, April 3, 2018
6:30PM
Halsey Institute Galleries

FILM SCREENING | Jason Moran: Looks of a Lot

Tuesday, April 10, 2018
7:00PM
Recital Hall, Simons Center for the Arts
54 St. Philips Street

Jason Moran: Looks of a Lot

This documentary film follows jazz pianist and composer Jason Moran as he prepared his multimedia project Looks of a Lot, which was performed at the Symphony Center in Chicago in May 2014. The film follows the project’s collaboration between Moran and his trio The Bandwagon (with drummer Nasheet Waits and bassist Tarus Mateen), artist Theaster Gates, musicians Ken Vandermark, Katie Ernst, and the Kenwood Academy High School Jazz Band. The film offers an in-depth behind-the-scenes look into the project, which connects Moran’s improvised blues compositions and Gates’ thought-provoking stage constructions made out of recycled materials as they trace the artistic history of Chicago.

A Q&A with RoundO Films’ Radiclani Clytus (Executive Producer), Gregg Conde (Cinematographer), and Anthony Gannon (Editor) will follow the screening.  They will discuss the making of Looks and their latest documentary feature Geechee, a Low Country-based project that is currently in pre-production.

About Jason Moran

Born in Houston, Jason Moran is a world-renowned jazz pianist and composer. A recipient of a 2010 MacArthur Fellowship, Moran is known for his innovative approach to his music, one that overlaps with social histories, the visual arts, and other seemingly disparate influences. A graduate of the Manhattan School of Music, Moran’s first album Soundtrack to Human Motion was released in 1999 and featured saxophonist Greg Osby among others. He later formed The Bandwagon, a trio including drummer Nasheet Waits and bassist Tarus Mateen, with which he has recorded several albums.

Moran’s engagements in the visual art world include projects with the 2015 Venice Biennale; dOCUMENTA 13, 2012; and the 2012 Whitney Biennial, among others. In 2008 he collaborated with Glenn Ligon on the film The Death of Tom, now in the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art, New York. He was commissioned by Harlem Stage in 2011 to create and perform “Fats Waller’s Dance Party,” an homage to the titular jazz musician of the first half of the twentieth century. Among other places, Moran performed “Fats Waller’s Dance Party” at the 2016 Spoleto Festival USA in Charleston in the Cistern at the College of Charleston.

About RoundO Films

Radiclani Clytus is a documentary filmmaker and historian of nineteenth-century literature. He holds a joint PhD in African American Studies and American Studies from Yale University and has published articles and essays on circum-Atlantic visual culture and the expressive methodologies of black music.  He is the editor of two compilations of prose works by poet Yusef Komunyakaa: Blue Notes: Essays, Interviews, and Commentaries (2000) and Condition Red (2017).  As the visiting humanities curator at the Avery Research Center for African American History and Culture, he will be contributing to their upcoming joint exhibition with the Charleston Library Society titled No Sanctuary.

Gregg Conde is a director and cinematographer based out of Brooklyn NY. He received his BA in Photography from San Jose State University and MFA in Film Directing from Columbia University. As a cinematographer, Gregg has lensed many award winning films, most notably Four (2012), starring Wendell Peirce in an Independent Spirit Award Nominated role, and Crystal (2014), a short narrative film premiering in competition at SXSW 2014. He is a founding member of Think/Feel a Brooklyn-based multidisciplinary creative collective.

Anthony Gannon is a documentary film director, radio producer, and commercial editor. He holds a B.A. from the University of Chicago where he fostered a love for film and a rigorous work ethic. His first feature documentary experience as co-editor occurred on In A Dream (2008), which won numerous awards at festivals such as SXSW and Full Frame. This documentary was followed by his co-direction of the short film, Days Dance (2009). In 2010, he edited MINUSTAH vole kabrit, a feature that screened at IDFA, and he has also co-edited the short film Paraíso (2013), which had a significant festival run and was short-listed for an Oscar nomination.

Photo:

Jason Moran: Looks of a Lot
Performance work commissioned by Chicago Symphony Orchestra
In collaboration with Theaster Gates
Featuring the Bandwagon, Katie Ernst, Ken Vandermark, and the Kenwood Academy Jazz Band
Chicago Symphony Orchestra, premiered May 30, 2014
Courtesy RoundO Films
Photo © Jason Moran; Courtesy of the artist, RoundO Films, and Luhring Augustine, New York.

FILM SCREENING | Jason Moran: Looks of a Lot

Tuesday, April 10, 2018
7:00PM
Recital Hall, Simons Center for the Arts
54 St. Philips Street

JENNIFER WEN MA | MEET THE MAKER

Tuesday, April 24, 2018
5:30-7:30PM
Halsey Institute Galleries

Artist presentation begins at 6:00pm. 

This lecture is part of our Meet the Maker series for Postmodernist members and above. To join our membership program, please visit here or call 843-953-5652.

Jennifer Wen Ma will have a solo exhibition at the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art in May 2019.

 Jennifer Wen Ma (1973, Beijing, China) is a visual artist who moved to the United States in 1986, and received her Master of Fine Art degree in 1999 from Pratt Institute, New York. Ma works and lives between New York and Beijing. Ma’s interdisciplinary practice bridges varied media such as installation, drawing, video, public art, design, performance, and theatre; often bringing together unlikely elements in a single piece, creating sensitive, poetic and poignant works.

Projects with international institutions include: A Beautiful Disorder at Cass Sculpture Foundation, 2016; What About the Art? at Qatar Museums, 2016; installation opera Paradise Interrupted, commissioned by Spoleto USA Festival, Lincoln Center Festival, and National Kaohsiung Center for the Arts, 2015, also previewed in the Temple of Dendur, The Metropolitan Museum of Art; Flux Projects, Atlanta; Market Square Public Art Program, Pittsburgh, 2015; 5×5 Nonument Park, Washington DC; Vancouver Art Gallery, 2014; Lower Manhattan Cultural Council, New York, 2013; Cambio Cultural, Belo Horizonte, Brazil, 2013; Performa 13, New York, 2013; The Republic of China Centennial Grand Countdown, Taipei, 2010; Biennale of Sydney, 2010; Echigo-Tsumari Triennial, Japan, 2009; Guggenheim Bilbao, Spain, 2009; Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, 2008; and the National Art Museum of China, Beijing, 2008, among others.

 Solo exhibitions include: Sandra Gering Inc, New York, 2017; Art021, Shanghai, 2016; Hanart Square, Hong Kong, 2013; Ullens Center For Contemporary Art, Beijing, 2012; Eslite Gallery, Taipei, 2012; and The Phillips Collection, Washington, DC, 2009. Permanent public installations include: Nature and Man in Rhapsody of Light at the Water Cube, The National Aquatic Center, Beijing, 2013; In-Between World—Daydream Nation, Digital Beijing Building, 2008; Aeolian Garden, city of Colle di Val d’Elsa, Italy, 2005, among others.

 In 2008, Ma was one of the seven members on the core creative team for the opening and closing ceremonies of the Beijing Olympics, and the chief designer for visual and special effects. She received an Emmy for the US broadcast of the ceremony.

JENNIFER WEN MA | MEET THE MAKER

Tuesday, April 24, 2018
5:30-7:30PM
Halsey Institute Galleries
Free For All
GALLERY HOURS (during exhibitions)
Monday – Saturday, 11am – 4pm
Open until 7pm on Thursdays
843.953.4422


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