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They say a picture is worth a thousand words, but this old adage merely scratches the surface regarding the power of art. Art has the potential for profound impact. It can stimulate emotions. It can communicate. Amuse. Astound. Inspire. And educate. Something so versatile is surely an invaluable resource, and that’s exactly how the directors of the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art at the College of Charleston see their work.

Last winter, this group decided to implement a new pilot program using the first exhibit of 2022 – Dyani White Hawk’s Hear Her. The concept, dubbed “Drive-by Discussions,” was simple: invite a handful of professors to bring their students to the gallery, have them take in the exhibit and then immediately afterward use that experience to spark discussion in the classroom.

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The Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art at the College of Charleston School of the Arts announces the upcoming exhibition, Kirsten Stolle: Only You Can Prevent A Forest for fall 2022. This exhibition will be on view at the Halsey Institute from Friday, August 26th to Saturday, December 10th, 2022. An opening reception is set for Friday, August 26th from 6:30 pm to 8 pm.

The Halsey Institute’s open hours are Monday – Saturday 11 am to 4 pm and 11 am to 7 pm on Thursdays, and the galleries are open to the public with free admission.

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Nancy Friedemann-Sánchez is a Colombian-American artist who captures through her works the curious and intense experience of having emigrated from her country of origin and still having a part of herself rooted in Colombia. 

She is currently creating a feminist visual novel composed of paintings, sculptures, objects, and mixed media that together represent a synchronicity of dialogues, passages, and punctuations about hybridity and cultural ownership.

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Calendar: A Favorite

Wed Jun 01, 2022
Convergence

“Nancy Friedemann-Sánchez: Pinturas de Casta and the Construction of American Identity” Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art, Charleston (USA) May 13-July 16, 2022

Casta paintings were a genre developed in Latin America by European colonizing powers to categorize, and consequently stigmatize, children born of parents of diverse ancestry. In her own version, Nancy Friedemann-Sánchez depicts crude patchworks as bodies to illustrate the racial stereotypes that continue to plague most of the Americas today.

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Corpus: the body. In the art of Kukuli Velarde, clay becomes flesh.
Corpus: a collection of works. Here, a coherent ensemble of fifteen clay effigies that took over a decade to complete.

Corpus: Christi. One of the most important religious celebrations in Christianity. In this case, Velarde constructs her own Corpus Christi procession with saint-like ceramics, each accompanied by its own banner.

A necessary complement to the exhibition, the catalog of the traveling show “Kukuli Velarde: Corpus” unveils various facets of the Peruvian artist’s work in a compelling assemblage of texts, interviews, photographs, and a letter from Velarde’s own mother.

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An insider’s take on one of two Halsey exhibits on view through mid-July.

Nancy Friedemann-Sánchez tells stories of our shared global histories through her artwork. She explores our world through the material culture left from generations past — seeking portals between then and now in an effort to understand who we’ve become through who we’ve been. Casta Paintings is no exception to this keen interest of the ways in which people shape identities. Individuals build a sense of self with familial and collective experiences influenced by and in resistance to cultural identity. The power structures that shape cultural identity are inherently imbalanced, and thus often perpetuate stereotypes. 

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The identity of a country and its people should come from culture and traditions born from within, but often the organic nature of who we are is bent by outside forces that encroach with different values and norms.

Two new exhibits opening May 13, 2022, at the College of Charleston’s Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art will explore such themes of culture and oppression, with both Kukuli Velarde’s CORPUS and Nancy Friedemann-Sánchez’ Pinturas de Casta and the Construction of American Identity addressing the legacy of South American colonialism.

According to Katie Hirsch, the Halsey’s director and chief curator, “Kukuli and Nancy both tackle a subject that is at once deeply complicated and very simple – that colonialism is not a static moment in time with a clear beginning and end.”

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Halsey Institute debuts two exciting new exhibitions

Mon May 09, 2022
Charleston City Paper

The Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art at the College of Charleston will open two new exhibitions on May 13, Kukuli Velarde: CORPUS and Nancy Friedemann-Sánchez: Pinturas de Casta and the Construction of American Identity

Made up of fifteen sculptures and banners, Velarde’s CORPUS speaks to and wrestles with Peru’s colonial past and mestizo identity. Velarde has crafted indigenous entities that have been a part of Peruvian culture despite being overwritten by European Catholic mythologies. These entities were not lost to the culture war, but cleverly hidden inside the iconography of the settlers. Peruvian-American Velarde is based in Philadelphia and works in the mediums of ceramic, painting, drawing and installation.

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The opening reception for the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art’s 37th annual Young Contemporaries exhibition is 5–7 p.m. on Friday, March 18, 2022, at the Halsey Institute, 161 Calhoun Street. The event is free and open to the public.

Juried by New Orleans–based visiting artist Ron BechetYoung Contemporaries 2022 represents the brightest talents from across the College – including painters, sculptors, printmakers and photographers majoring in everything from public health to studio art to marine biology. The students get the opportunity not only to have their work chosen by a nationally prominent juror and exhibit in a professional gallery setting, but also to prepare for future gallery exhibits and practice the type of professionalism necessary for success in such a competitive field.

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Consider the work of Dyani White Hawk, an Minneapolis-based artist of Sicangu Lakota, German and Welsh ancestry, who draws from her Native culture in her work. Her work is the subject of an exhibition at the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art, “Dyani White Hawk: Hear Her,” on view through Feb. 26.

Here’s the thing. With White Hawk, we can’t know those stories. Why? Because we don’t understand what they are saying. White Hawk’s work immerses viewers in the worlds of Native women by way of the distinct language of each Indigenous woman’s nation.

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Free For All
GALLERY HOURS (during exhibitions)
Monday - Saturday, 11am – 4pm
Open Thursdays until 7pm
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