Free For All
GALLERY HOURS (during exhibitions)
Monday - Friday, 11am – 4pm
Open Thursdays until 7pm
EDU BLOG ARCHIVES
We asked our spring 2021 intern Emma to complete one of the activities in the Writing Prompts for Visual Art packet we created to guide museum goers of all ages to engage more deeply with works of visual art. Emma chose to do the Bloom's Taxonomy page using Meghan Donohue's painting "All Consuming" in Young Contemporaries 2021.
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We asked our spring 2021 intern Emma to complete one of the activities in the Writing Prompts for Visual Art packet we created to guide museum goers of all ages to engage more deeply with works of visual art. Emma chose to create a Tongue Twister using the Best in Printmaking artwork in Young Contemporaries 2021.
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We asked our spring 2021 intern Adj to complete one of the activities in the Writing Prompts for Visual Art packet we created to guide museum goers of all ages to engage more deeply with works of visual art. Adj chose to create diamante poems for five pieces in Young Contemporaries 2021.
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We asked our spring 2021 intern Desmond to complete one of the activities in our Teaching Resource packet created for the "Larson Shindelman: Geolocation" exhibition. Desmond chose this prompt: “Larson Shindelman create photographs based off of tweets (short captions). For this activity, refer to the photographs in this packet and write your own tweets in 280 characters or less to accompany each. You can also create your own hashtags to accompany the caption and photo."
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When social media first surfaced into society, people viewed social media as a “thing” rather than a “place”, let alone a substitute for reality. As society’s understanding and usage of social media progressed, people literally could form, embellished, and/or escape from any reality with just a press of a button. The relationships between digital spaces and physical spaces are intertwined but they’re not mutually exclusive, no matter how large a physical setting a digital setting always has the potential to reach more people/places.
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We asked our spring 2021 intern Holland to complete one of the activities in our Teaching Resource packet created for the "Larson Shindelman: Geolocation" exhibition. Holland chose this prompt: “A time capsule is a collection of objects put together to preserve the memory of a place, experience, or group of people at one point in time. People often make time capsules for special public occasions, and for others to open many years in the future. You can make one to celebrate a family event, to remind you of a special experience, or to remember friends, family, or school – or something else important to you."
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The piece by Larson Shindelman that particularly blew me away was the one titled Have My Location, 2011 there is something so intriguing about the assembly of orange bushes in such a clearly rural setting, paired with a tweet that reads “These tweets have my location?” Not only is it hard to tell exactly where “my location” is from this image but the bushes are full enough that it appears as though one could get away with hiding and disappearing into them. This rustic feeling further pushes the idea of nature as an escape from our reality, which is crucial when the modern world revolves around technology and will only continue to do so.
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Geolocation | Lost My Dad

Fri Feb 19, 2021
Coming freshly out of the College of Charleston as an Art History major, one of the most important things I’ve learned is how to build deeper connections. The Larson Shindelman exhibition evokes this same set of skills from its audience. The two artists invite their audience to make connections between a tweet made by a certain anonymous author and the visual photograph captured by the artists in the specific Geolocation of where the tweet was posted. The most direct connection between a tweet and a photograph is they both serve as markers for a certain place and moment in time. It is our job as the audience to find even deeper connections between these two markers when presented together.
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Geolocation | So Proud of Me

Thu Feb 18, 2021
Ever since I was a little girl, roller coasters have terrified me. Not only roller coasters, but any amusement park ride that is seemingly more “thrilling” then a merry-go-round. The extreme heights and the intense speed always seem to make my stomach drop and my forehead start to sweat. So, when I came across this piece in the Larson Shindelman exhibition Geolocation, I immediately felt a sense of familiarity with the tweet that was posted along with the photograph.
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#Mobilize | Jesus Help Us

Wed Feb 17, 2021
The Larson Shindelman geolocated tweets serve as a powerful contrast between our digital and physical environments. By showing desolate, often dilapidated, areas accompanied by thoughts turned to text, the images create their own eerily still chaos; they seem strangely “loud” given their banal subjects. The tweets, however, are eclectic, and often passionate, adding to the overall “volume” of the piece.
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Free For All
GALLERY HOURS (during exhibitions)
Monday - Friday, 11am – 4pm
Open Thursdays until 7pm
843.953.4422

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