Meet the Maker is a unique opportunity for Halsey Institute Members at the Postmodernists and above levels to meet an artist and learn about their creative process within the intimate setting of the galleries. These quarterly get togethers create a casual environment in which members connect with each other and the featured artist over wine and heavy hors d’oeuvres. The Maker is often an upcoming or past exhibiting artist at the Halsey Institute. He or she will give a presentation describing their inspiration, passions, process, and, ultimately, final result. Members are asked to bring “a bottle of wine and an open mind.”
 
All Meet the Maker events take place at the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art unless otherwise noted. Join or renew at the Postmodernist membership level here to be invited to these events. 
Invitations to each Meet the Maker are sent via email. For questions or more information please contact Tatjana Beylotte at beylottetf@cofc.edu or 843-953-5652.
 
Thank you to our sponsor Caviar & Bananas for providing the refreshments for the 2016-2017 Meet the Maker series. 

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MEET THE MAKER EVENTS

RACHEL BOILLOT | MEET THE MAKER

Thursday, April 27, 5:30-7:30pm

Artist presentation begins at 6pm

This lecture is part of our Meet the Maker series for Postmodernist members and above. To join our membership program, please visit here or call 843-953-5652.

Rachel Boillot is a photographer, documentary artist, and educator based in Cumberland Gap, Tennessee. Boillot has recently served as a Visiting Lecturer in Photography at Duke University and as a Multimedia Documentarian for the Friends of the Cumberland Trail. Her work has been funded by the Annenberg Foundation (Los Angeles, CA), the Riverview Foundation (Chattanooga, TN), the Tennessee Arts Commission (Nashville, TN), and the National Endowment for the Arts (Washington, D.C.). Boillot teaches in the Art Department at Lincoln Memorial University, serves as Assistant Producer at Sandrock Recordings, directs the Cumberland Gap Folklife Project, and maintains her independent photography practice in East Tennessee.

Boillot is one of the fifty-five photographers who will be featured in the upcoming fall 2018 exhibition, Southbound: Photographs of and about the New South. Her photographs in Southbound will feature images from three different bodies of work: Post Script, which documents disappearing rural post offices and the communities they serve, Silent Ballad, which explores musical heritage in East Tennessee, and Despues del Dia, which looks at the dwelling places of migrant Hispanic farmworkers in North Carolina.

 

TOM STANLEY | MEET THE MAKER

Tuesday, February 21, 5:30-7:30pm

Artist presentation begins at 6pm

This lecture is part of our Meet the Maker series for Postmodernist members and above. To join our membership program, please visit here or call 843-953-5652.

Artist Tom Stanley will be featured at our Meet the Maker event on February 21, 2017. A large selection of Stanley’s vivid paintings and drawings will be on view at the Halsey Institute during the show Tom Stanley: Scratching the Surface, May 19 – July 8, 2017.

Over the past several decades, Tom Stanley has utilized sgraffito as a significant component of his abstract paintings. Popular in the Italian Renaissance of the 15th and 16th centuries, sgraffito refers to the practice of scratching a layer of paint to reveal a contrasting layer beneath it. In his geometric abstractions, the sgraffito adds an inherently expressive quality, creating a contrast between the frenzied scratching and his clinically precise lines and forms. His works also explore the history of painting techniques: beyond sgraffito, his works often contain drips of paint evoking Abstract Expressionism, and his expressive lines recall Surrealist automatic drawing.  

Stanley’s abstractions draw on the forms of the world around him, typically including items like boats, ladders, water towers, and houses. In his recent Vessels series, his canvases riff on the motif of a boat, often portraying one of more such vessels amidst a plane of harried lines and sgraffito. Such a series emphasize the duality contained within his paintings: expressive yet measured, formally-engaged  yet conceptually-driven, abstract yet connected to reality.

ALEX HARRIS | NOVEMBER 1 MEET THE MAKER

Tuesday, November 1, 5:30-7:30pm

Artist presentation begins at 6pm

This lecture is part of our Meet the Maker series for Postmodernist members and above. To join our membership program, please visit here or call 843-953-5652.

The Mind and the Machine

For his presentation at the Halsey Institute, Alex Harris’s talk is titled: The Mind and the Machine from a quote by Walker Evans.

“The secret of photography is, the camera takes on the character and the personality of the handler. The mind works on the machine – through it, rather.”

-Walker Evans from an interview with Leslie Katz in 1971

He will speak primarily about his work from Cuba and Mobile, Alabama.

Alex Harris is a photographer, writer, and teacher. He has photographed for extended periods in Cuba, the Inuit villages of Alaska, the Hispanic villages of northern New Mexico, and across the American South. He is a Professor of the Practice of Public Policy and Documentary Studies at Duke University and has taught at Duke for more than three decades, most recently in the Master of Fine Arts in Experimental and Documentary Arts Program.  He is a founder of the Center for Documentary Studies (1989) and of DoubleTake Magazine (1995). Harris’s awards include a Guggenheim Fellowship in Photography, a Rockefeller Foundation Humanities Fellowship, and a Lyndhurst Prize. His book, River of Traps, with William deBuys was a 1991 finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in general non-fiction. Harris’s work is represented in major photographic collections, including The J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles, the High Museum of Art in Atlanta, and The San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. His photographs have been exhibited widely, including two solo exhibitions at the International Center of Photography in New York. As a photographer and editor, Harris has published fifteen books, including The Idea of Cuba (2007) and Why We are Here: Mobile and the Spirit of a Southern City (2012), with E. O. Wilson. 

Visit his website here.

DEBORAH LUSTER | SEPTEMBER 27 MEET THE MAKER

Tuesday, 5:30-7:30pm.
Artist presentation begins at 6pm.

This lecture is part of our Meet the Maker series for Postmodernist members and above. To join our membership program, please visit here or call 843-953-5652.

Deborah Luster is best known for the series, One Big Self: Prisoners of Louisiana, which she undertook in 1998 with poet C. D. Wright. This collection of photographic portraits portrays prisoners from three Louisiana prisons including the infamous Louisiana State Penitentiary at Angola. In her 2003 monograph (One Big Self, Twin Palms Publishing), she writes, “I chose to photograph each person as they presented their very own selves before my camera on the chance that I might be fortunate enough to contact, as poet Jack Gilbert writes ‘their hearts in their marvelous cases.’” These portraits—painstakingly printed on 5 x 4 inch sheets of black aluminum—are individualistic, diverse and emotionally compelling. Her work is included in the permanent collections of the Whitney Museum of American Art, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Museum of Fine Arts in Houston, New Orleans Museum of Art, and other notable public and private collections. One Big Self was shown at the Halsey Institute in 2007. A recent project, Tooth for an Eye: A Choreography of Violence in Orleans Parish (Twin Palms Publishing, 2011) is a photographic archive documenting contemporary and historical homicide sites in New Orleans, the homicide capital of the United States. The result is an exploration of the dizzyingly empty space at the core of violence. Luster approaches this invisible, excised population obliquely, with haunting, unpopulated photographs that seem to exist outside of time, simultaneously distant and chillingly close.

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Deborah Luster will be participating in Southbound: Photographs of and about the New South at the Halsey Institute in Fall 2017. She will be showing works from the series Passion Play, which features prison actors in home-made costumes dressed as Biblical figures.

Check out her website HERE.

FAHAMU PECOU |APRIL 26

Meet the Maker with Fahamu Pecou

Sponsored in part by:

Screen Shot 2015-09-14 at 12.45.17 AM Tuesday, April 26, 2016
5:30-7:30pm
 

 

Inside the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art
161 Calhoun Street, 1st Floor
Downtown Charleston, SC 

Current Members (Postmodernists and above) of the Halsey Institute are cordially invited to our second Meet the Maker presentation of 2016 with featured artist Fahamu Pecou.
 
Seating is limited. Your RSVP is requested by Tuesday, April 19 to halsey@cofc.edu
 
Please bring an open mind and a bottle of wine.

Fahamu Pecou is a visual artist and scholar whose works combine observations on hip-hop, fine art, and popular culture. As Pecou states: “My work seeks to provide a crucial intervention in contemporary representations of Black masculinity. I began my career experimenting with the branding strategies employed in hip-hop music and entertainment. These experiments ultimately led me to question not only the stereotypes engendered by the commodification of hip-hop culture but, more, to consider how the influence of historic and social configurations of race, class, and gender impact and inform these representations.”

Fahamu Pecou will exhibit at the Halsey Institute in Fall 2016.

LAWRENCE LABIANCA |April 7, 2016

LaBianca_Continuum lrMeet the Maker with Lawrence LaBianca

Thursday, April 7, 2016
5:30-7:30pm

The Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art invites you to the fourth Meet the Maker event this season featuring San Francisco based artist Lawrence LaBianca. His work integrates research, experimentation and exercises in creating kinetic sculptures that harness natural phenomena to generate drawings, etchings, digital imagery and sound. What’s left is a record of wind, waves, water, time and light.

www.lawrencelabianca.com
 
Bring a bottle of wine and an open mind.
Artist presentation begins at 6pm.  

Thank you to Meet the Maker sponsors:
Show and Tell Art & Design
Caviar & Bananas

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SARA ANGELUCCI |FEB 16, 2016

Meet the Maker with Sara Angelucci
Sponsored in part by:

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Tuesday, February 16, 2016
5:30-7:30pm
 

 

Inside the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art
161 Calhoun Street, 1st Floor
Downtown Charleston, SC
 

Current Members (Postmodernists and above) of the Halsey Institute are cordially invited to our first Meet the Maker presentation of 2016 with featured artist Sara Angelucci.
 
Seating is limited. Your RSVP is requested by Tuesday, February 9 to halsey@cofc.edu
 
Please bring an open mind and a bottle of wine.
 

Toronto-based artist Sara Angelucci’s practice is based in photography, video, and audio, and analyzes the original context in which images are made. Drawing attention to conventions of image- making, her work foregrounds the cultural role vernacular images play in framing particular stories, creating histories, and memorialization. Over the years, her projects have developed from an examination of the family archive and immigration to a broader analysis and interpretation of anonymous/found photographs.  

Sara Angelucci will exhibit at the Halsey Institute in Fall 2016.

JOHN McWILLIAMS | DEC 5, 2015

Meet the Maker with John McWilliams
Sponsored in part by:

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Saturday, December 5, 2015
5:30-7:30pm
 
Inside the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art
161 Calhoun Street, 1st Floor
Downtown Charleston, SC
 
Current Patron Members ($350+) of the Halsey Institute are cordially invited to our final Meet the Maker presentation of 2015 with featured artist John McWilliams.
 
Seating is limited. Your RSVP is requested by Thursday, November 26 to halsey@cofc.edu
 
Please bring an open mind and a bottle of wine.
 
John McWilliams was born in 1941 and currently resides in McClellanville, SC. He received his BFA and MFA from Rhode Island School of Design and is Professor/Director Emeritus of Georgia State University School of Art and Design. McWilliams has received numerous awards, including the Guggenheim Foundation Fellowship and the National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship in photography.

McWilliams continues to work as a photographer in addition to printmaking and drawing. He has been making woodcuts for about twenty years and describes his work as inspired by experiences and life in the Lowcountry, where the issues of life and its transitions are so poignantly felt within the landscape. Focusing primarily on printmaking, woodcuts, and wood engravings, McWilliams is inspired and stimulated by the repetition of the block prints and their ability to be recreated identically time and time again to create a unified body of work – much like the organic transitions of the landscapes he observes. McWilliams says, “My work centers me and puzzles me which sounds like a contradiction. It makes me feel alive.”

John McWilliams will exhibit at the Halsey Institute in January 2016.

JIHA MOON | Sept 1

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Sponsored in part by:
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Tuesday, September 1, 2015
5:30-7:30pm
 
Inside the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art
161 Calhoun Street, 1st Floor
Downtown Charleston, SC
 
Current Patron Members ($350+) of the Halsey Institute are cordially invited to our third Meet the Maker presentation of 2015 with featured artist Jiha Moon.
 
Seating is limited. Your RSVP is requested by Thursday, August 27 to halsey@cofc.edu.
 
Please bring an open mind and a bottle of wine.
 
The Halsey Institute is pleased to present an exhibition featuring new works by multi-media artist Jiha Moon (born 1973) on view October 24 – December 5, 2015. Born and raised in Daegu, Korea, Jiha Moon lives and works in Atlanta where she creates work that encompass cultural elements native to Korea, Japan, China the US, and the Internet. Throughout her work these elements are blended to investigate the multi-faceted nature of our current global identity as influenced by popular culture, technology, racial perceptions, and folklore. Moon explores how Westerners perceive other cultures and how perceived foreigners see the West.  In her work, Moon acts in the role of a traveler, and explores the notion that identity is not beholden to geographic location. The works incorporate elements of Asian influence such as Hanji paper and Korean silk, along side Westerners’ perception of “Asian culture” with fortune cookies and blue willow china patterns. Jiha Moon’s work appears as a mash-up of high-and-low brow cultural references. Upon further inspection, slyly ironic and humorous references emerge that are satirically filtered by the artist, who reminds us that our preconceived notion of “others” is not a true manifestation of actual identity.

BURK UZZLE | APRIL 28, 2015

Screen Shot 2015-04-11 at 4.15.15 PMBurk Uzzle’s career, like his pictures, is a nuanced composition blending American culture, individual psyches of particular places or people, and an atypical way of seeing ourselves, our values, and our community. Always respectful yet locating the poignant or quirky, the history of his narrative belongs to all of us. Initially grounded in documentary photography when he was the youngest photographer ever hired by LIFE magazine at age 23, his work then grew into a combination of split-second impressions reflecting the human condition during his tenure as a member of the prestigious international Magnum cooperative founded by one of his mentors Henri Cartier-Bresson. For fifteen years, Uzzle was an active contributor to the evolution of the organization and served as its President in 1979 and 1980. During the sixteen years he was associated with Magnum, he produced some of the most recognizable images we have of Woodstock (album cover and worldwide reproduction of its iconic couple hugging at dawn) to the assassination and funeral of Martin Luther King Jr. to our comprehension for the experience of Cambodian war refugees.

His archive spans almost six decades. His current work rests deep in photographic appreciation of the quiet, strong, and eloquent beauty he discovers in America’s small towns and its people. Uzzle’s current body of work is the production of artful and constructed reflections of his subjects, many of whom are African-American residents proximal to his studio in North Carolina. Their layers of experience are conjoined with Uzzle’s fundamental appreciation for unseen characteristics, which he ably captures in a collaborative, interpretive context along with his eye and his heart. interpretation, of art, of independently produced projects.

LONNIE HOLLEY | FEB 25, 2015

lonnie-holleyThe Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art is organizing a residency, exhibition, video, and monograph featuring the work of American vernacular artist Lonnie Holley. Something to Take My Place: The Art of Lonnie Holley will be on view at the Halsey Institute from August 21 to October 10, 2015, and will feature a selection of the artist’s assemblage works from 1984 to 2015.

Lonnie Holley incorporates natural and man-made objects already imbued with cultural and artistic associations, into narrative sculptures that commemorate places, people, and events. Holley believes that art and life are in constant need of renewal so he chooses to work with objects that have been discarded or appear worn and gives them a new life.

ALYSON SHOTZ | DEC 8, 2014

ALYSON-SHOTZAlyson Shotz’s practice examines the properties and interactions of light, gravity, mass, and space. Shotz bridges disciplines in her work, drawing on scientific methods, mathematical principles, and literature, among other diverse fields. Often employing nontraditional materials such as glass beads, linen thread, stainless-steel filaments, and welded aluminum to create large-scale abstract sculptures, Shotz expands upon conventional notions of sculptural space and form.

Shotz’s work will be featured in the exhibition Force of Nature, May 22 – July 11, 2015. Alyson Shotz: Force of Nature marks the artist’s most ambitious show to date. More than fifty works in various mediums will be on view throughout the Halsey Institute, representing the range of Shotz’s artistic output. The exhibition includes a monumental sculptural installation;  a site-specific, volumetric wall drawing; and a collaborative animation, as well as digital and traditional prints, photographs, and ceramics.

PAT POTTER | OCT 6, 2014

Screen Shot 2014-09-06 at 1.18.00 PMPat Potter creates enigmatic artworks in the form of three-dimensional maps that she refers to as Isomorphic Maps. Ostensibly representing a one-hundred-mile stretch of northern Alabama, these works also expand outward to the cosmos, then inward again into the dark energy of particle physics. The series, called Patterns of Place, offers a tantalizing mix of technical experimentation, metaphoric expansiveness, and curiosity in every square inch. Born in Charleston, but a longtime resident of Alabama, Potter has developed her own artmaking techniques, informed by her extensive background in architecture. Through the development of these idiosyncratic techniques, she has found ways to give unique expression to the ideas that animate her.

Pat Potter: Patterns of Place will be our featured exhibition in January 2015, and will then travel nationally.  We are producing a monograph and video to accompany the exhibition.

KATHLEEN ROBBINS | MAY 7, 2014

Screen Shot 2014-09-04 at 11.09.37 AMKathleen Robbins is an associate professor of art, coordinator of the photography program, and affiliate faculty of Southern Studies at the University of South Carolina. Born in Washington, DC and raised in the Mississippi Delta, Robbins received her MFA from the University of New Mexico in 2001. Her photographs have been exhibited in galleries and museums nationwide.

Robbins’ series Into the Flatland will be exhibited at the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art in fall 2014. Into the Flatland explores familial obligation and our conflicted relationship with “home.” The photographs in this series were made over a period of several years during regular trips home to visit family in the Mississippi Delta.

MICHAEL MORAN & MICHAEL MORAN | Feb 18, 2014

Screen Shot 2014-03-05 at 2.39.16 PMFor the first 2014 event, we invited two artists, who shared their process together.

 

MICHAEL MORAN, wordcraft

Dr. Michael Moran is a retired psychiatrist who lives on a small farm near Frankfort, Kentucky, with his wife Vivian. His collection of poems, The Fallen World, was published by Larkspur Press in 2008. In 2013, October Press published a broadside of his poem “How To Read a Book”. His work has been featured on NPR’s The Writer’s Almanac.

MICHAEL MORAN, woodcraft

Dr. Moran’s son, Michael, was born in Kentucky and lived in Tennessee and Wisconsin in his younger years. Academia and sports initially brought him to the College of Charleston in the late 1990s. Since 2002, Michael has been practicing his craft in Charleston, South Carolina, first as an apprentice and then as the proprietor of Moran Woodworked Furniture. In 2013, we commissioned him to create a unique video viewing environment within the Halsey galleries. He chose to create a cavern, complete with stalagmites and stalactites, comprised of stratified
layers of wood. Michael is known to hug trees whenever possible.

JODY ZELLEN | Sept 24, 2013

Screen Shot 2013-09-20 at 6.23.13 PMJody Zellen is a Los Angeles-based artist who works in many media simultaneously to make interactive installations, mobile apps, net art, animations, drawings, paintings, photographs, public art, and artists’ books. She employs media-generated representations as raw material for aesthetic and social investigations. Zellen’s work will be featured in the exhibition, Above the Fold in January at the Halsey Institute.

JUMAADI | Nov 19, 2013

JumaadiContemporary Javanese artist Jumaadi’s work is about the intersection between global, trans-national and trans-cultural issues and everyday realities. His works take many forms, he is an eclectic artist who has grabbed onto the potential of art – moving across mediums from performance, to writing. He makes paintings, watercolors, drawings, even shadows. Jumaadi’s work will be featured in the exhibition, Forgive me not to miss you not in 2014 at the Halsey Institute.

 

Community Partners 2017