Free For All
GALLERY HOURS (during exhibitions)
Monday – Saturday, 11am – 4pm
Open until 7pm on Thursdays

May - June, 2002

Group Show

PORTRAITS ET PERSONNAGES

May - June, 2002

Group Show

PORTRAITS ET PERSONNAGES

Portraits et Personnages: Selected Works from the Collection de I’ Art Brut’s Neuve Invention presented 50 works on paper that depicts portraits or human characterizations from the internationally recognized museum in Lausanne, Switzerland. Co-curated by Genevieve Roulin and Tom Stanley, the exhibition provided a glimpse of some of Roulin’s favorite artists from the museum’s Neuve Invention Collection. Roulin was the curator at the Collection de I’Art Brut until her death this past January.

The Collection de I’Art Brut was established in Lausanne in 1976 to house art works collected by French modern artist Jean Dubuffet (1901-1985). Disillusioned from an early age by what he considered the “artificial, elitist, venal and publicity-seeking institutions set up to support the arts,” Dubuffet looked outside of the established art world for a purer, more honest art form. He found it in artwork that had not been compromised by the academy or gallery system.
Though the artists that Dubuffet discovered often existed on the margins of society, he contended that their art revealed a raw, singular vision. According to Michel Thevoz, director of the Collection de l’Art BrutDubuffet sought out “an art free of the dictates of tradition or fashion, an art liberated from all social compromise, an art which draws its strength from an impassioned way of thinking and an almost autistic inner necessity.”

In addition to the primary collection of Art Brut, Dubuffet established a second collection called “Neuve Invention” (fresh invention). Though many of these works did not represent the initial “radical distancing” from the art world that typified Art Brut, they nonetheless challenged the fine-art system that, according to Dubuffet, stifled a revolutionary art of consequence. In many ways, Dubuffet’s passionate advocacy of Art Brut and the Neuve Invention was a political attack on what he considered to be a stagnant cultural establishment. “

Another aspect of this exhibition, which was meaningful, was the opportunity to see an aesthetic accepted by many collectors in Europe. Certainly different from “Outsider” or contemporary folk art that has a following in the United States, Art Brut and the Neuve Invention has a more psychological edge; said co-curator Stanley.

Group Show

PORTRAITS ET PERSONNAGES

May - June, 2002
Free For All
GALLERY HOURS (during exhibitions)
Monday – Saturday, 11am – 4pm
Open until 7pm on Thursdays
843.953.4422


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