PAST PRESS

  • 2015 (5)
  • 2014 (49)
  • 2013 (32)
  • 2012 (32)
  • 2011 (25)
  • 2010 (18)
  • 2009 (25)
  • 2008 (13)


  • RECENT PRESS COVERAGE

    Bill Carson brings friends, collaborators together for Groundhog Day concert | Sun. Jan. 25, 2015

    Post & Courier

    He’s probably not the first one you’ll notice on stage. His is a small white flame charisma, not a raging red burn.

    Bill Carson is slight, bespectacled, quiet, perfectly content to show off his friends. He stands there, unassuming, behind his twangy hollow-body guitar.

    FULL STORY »

    Patricia Boinest Potter creates abstract, multidimensional maps | Wed. Jan. 21, 2015

    Charleston City Paper

    If you were to try to describe the work of Alabama-based artist Patricia Boinest Potter, you would probably find yourself gravitating toward phrases like “three-dimensional,” “mixed media,” and “inspired by nature” — descriptors, in other words, that are solid, simple, understandable. Of course, these are also terms that tell you almost nothing.

    FULL STORY »

    At the intersection of mapping and metaphysics | Sun. Jan. 18, 2015

    The Anniston Star

    “Patterns of Place” by Anniston artist Pat Potter is a collection of abstract three-dimensional maps, based on a 100-mile stretch of northern Alabama from Little River Canyon to Mount Cheaha. The exhibit consists of six large “map tables” and 100 smaller “map insets.”

    FULL STORY »

    Anniston artist Pat Potter is poised for national recognition | Sun. Jan. 18, 2015

    The Anniston Star

    When Pat Potter became a grandmother, she didn’t want a grandmother name like “Grandmother” or “Nana.” She wanted to be called “Magic.”

    And so she is.

    Like the alchemists of old, Pat Potter is able to transform, well, maybe not lead into gold, but ideas into substance, artifacts into art.

    FULL STORY »

    Something Unlike Anything You’ve Ever Seen Is Coming to the Halsey | Thu. Jan. 15, 2015

    The College Today

    The Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art at the College of Charleston kicks off 2015 with the Patricia Boinest Potter’s exhibit, Patterns of Place. The opening reception is on Friday, January 23, from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m., and will be open to the public and include refreshments and light hors d’oeuvres. The following day – Saturday, January 24 – there will be a gallery walkthrough with the artist at 2 p.m. There is also a curator-led walkthrough at 6 p.m. on Thursday, March 5. The exhibit will be on view until March 7, 2015.

    FULL STORY »

    Obey Giant artist picks Halsey show as top moment of 2014 | Wed. Dec. 31, 2014

    Charleston City Paper

    In a blog post today, street artist Shepard Fairey laid out his top five moments of 2014 and lo and behold: the show he did this May at the Halsey Institute for Contemporary Art was number one. The Insistent Image: Recurring Motifs in the Art of Shepard Fairey and Jasper Johns comprised not only Fairey’s prints and paintings, but also four murals and one installation in five different spots in Charleston. (Read our cover story, “Raw Power: Shepard Fairey explores empire and the American Dream this Spoleto season,” on the exhibit here.)

    FULL STORY »

    Spotlight on Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art | Wed. Dec. 10, 2014

    National Endowment for the Arts

    The Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art may be housed in a modest suite of gallery and office space on the College of Charleston campus, but its reach far exceeds its physical footprint. With a primary focus on artists “in the margins,” as Chief Curator Mark Sloan puts it, the museum shines a spotlight on artists who, given the depth, quality, and imaginative impact of their work deserve to be much better known. As we learned when we spoke with Sloan by telephone, the Halsey deploys a number of strategies to support the artists it shows.

    FULL STORY »

    Poetic arts and shadow puppets with Indonesian multimedia artist Jumaadi | Wed. Nov. 19, 2014

    Cistern Yard

    There’s something quite startling about Indonesian artist Jumaadi’s art style. Echoing the primeval cave drawing of Lascaux, or perhaps the pottery art of ancient Greece, Jumaadi captures beautifully stylized depictions of human and animal nature alike in his newest art collection,  Jumaadi: forgive me not to miss you not, on display now at the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art.

    FULL STORY »

    New exhibit opens at Halsey | Mon. Oct. 27, 2014

    Cistern Yard

    “I discover something new each time I step into the galleries.” Karen Ann Myers, Associate Directory of the Halsey, said. The mission of the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art, the Colleges’ on campus art gallery is to “provide a multidisciplinary laboratory for the production, presentation, interpretation, and dissemination of ideas by innovative visual artists from around the world.” Their latest exhibition, which opened Oct. 17, does just that featuring the work of relatively unknown Indonesian multimedia artist Jumaadi alongside one of Picassos’ lesser known collaborations Diurnes.

    FULL STORY »

    Indonesian artist Jumaadi paints in an ancient language | Wed. Oct. 15, 2014

    Charleston City Paper

    Looking at the Indonesian artist Jumaadi’s works, one is reminded of art from long, long ago: ancient Greece, perhaps, or the cave paintings of Lascaux.

    It’s not because of any similarities in style. Jumaadi’s work, which will be on display at the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art through Dec. 6, is rougher, without the formal constraints of the Greeks or the fluidity of Lascaux. Rather, it’s because Jumaadi’s visual language, like those bygone artists, is one of archetype. Rain, trees, wild beasts, and stark, disembodied human faces haunt his paintings and drawings, creating a world of primordial and universal symbols that one could devote much time, and anthropological study, to reading.

    FULL STORY »

    Community Partners 2014