PAST PRESS

  • 2014 (47)
  • 2013 (32)
  • 2012 (32)
  • 2011 (25)
  • 2010 (18)
  • 2009 (25)
  • 2008 (13)


  • RECENT PRESS COVERAGE

    Poetic arts and shadow puppets with Indonesian multimedia artist Jumaadi | Wed. Nov. 19, 2014

    Cistern Yard

    There’s something quite startling about Indonesian artist Jumaadi’s art style. Echoing the primeval cave drawing of Lascaux, or perhaps the pottery art of ancient Greece, Jumaadi captures beautifully stylized depictions of human and animal nature alike in his newest art collection,  Jumaadi: forgive me not to miss you not, on display now at the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art.

    FULL STORY »

    New exhibit opens at Halsey | Mon. Oct. 27, 2014

    Cistern Yard

    “I discover something new each time I step into the galleries.” Karen Ann Myers, Associate Directory of the Halsey, said. The mission of the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art, the Colleges’ on campus art gallery is to “provide a multidisciplinary laboratory for the production, presentation, interpretation, and dissemination of ideas by innovative visual artists from around the world.” Their latest exhibition, which opened Oct. 17, does just that featuring the work of relatively unknown Indonesian multimedia artist Jumaadi alongside one of Picassos’ lesser known collaborations Diurnes.

    FULL STORY »

    Indonesian artist Jumaadi paints in an ancient language | Wed. Oct. 15, 2014

    Charleston City Paper

    Looking at the Indonesian artist Jumaadi’s works, one is reminded of art from long, long ago: ancient Greece, perhaps, or the cave paintings of Lascaux.

    It’s not because of any similarities in style. Jumaadi’s work, which will be on display at the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art through Dec. 6, is rougher, without the formal constraints of the Greeks or the fluidity of Lascaux. Rather, it’s because Jumaadi’s visual language, like those bygone artists, is one of archetype. Rain, trees, wild beasts, and stark, disembodied human faces haunt his paintings and drawings, creating a world of primordial and universal symbols that one could devote much time, and anthropological study, to reading.

    FULL STORY »

    Jumaadi + Picasso at the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art | Fri. Sep. 26, 2014

    The Art Mag

    Beginning in October, the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art will feature Indonesian artist, Jumaadi, and his exhibition Forgive Me Not To Miss You Not.  Jumaadi has exhibited globally in Australia, Europe, Asia, the Netherlands, and he was recently selected for the Moscow Biennale.  This is a hallmark exhibition—his first in the United States.  As the Halsey’s International Artist in Residence for Fall 2014, for the past two months, Jumaadi has had the opportunity to foster a meaningful relationship with the Charleston community while developing his exhibit.

    FULL STORY »

    Best Art Galleries in Charleston | Mon. Sep. 22, 2014

    Travel + Leisure

    The history, gardens, and sea of South Carolina have long inspired a tradition of art both in Charleston and the surrounding Lowlands. In town, the annual Spoleto performing arts festival doesn’t focus on the visual arts, but still influences the city’s culture scene with shows featuring renowned dancers, singers, and actors. Year-round, painters set up plein-air easels on downtown streets to work on their harbor and marsh views. And gallery and pop-up events can be found on any block in 19th-century storefronts or diverse settings from Marion Square Park to the Old City Jail. Like a glass of wine with your art? On Friday nights, there’s likely an opening reception or two, or even a neighborhood art walk. These crawls are an easy, no-pressure way to check out what’s new on the art scene and meet some locals in a wandering crowd of Charleston’s culture-seekers. Here are a few of the best art galleries in Charleston.

    FULL STORY »

    Yaakov Israel: The Quest for the Man on the White Donkey at the Halsey Institute for Contemporary Art | Tue. Sep. 16, 2014

    Daily Serving

    In 1981, John Baldessari said, “Probably one of the worst things to happen to photography is that cameras have viewfinders…” but artist Yaakov Israel would certainly disagree.[1] Israel’s photographs in The Quest for the Man on the White Donkey at the Halsey Institute for Contemporary Art in Charleston, South Carolina, are carefully constructed. Israeli-born and -based, Israel relishes the serendipitous encounters he’s had while exploring the geography and people of his native land, and this show is a case in point: As he was packing up his equipment after a long day in the desert looking for subjects for his photographs, Israel was approached by an elderly man riding a white donkey.

    FULL STORY »

    The importance of street photography and Cheryl Dunn’s ‘Everybody Street’ | Tue. Sep. 9, 2014

    Cistern Yard

    There’s something overwhelmingly remarkable about the anatomy of a city street. Like concrete veins sprawling from a massive urban body, the streets carry with them the most vital component to the city: its lifeblood, its people.

    FULL STORY »

    Q&A with Israeli photographer Yaakov Israel | Sun. Sep. 7, 2014

    Post & Courier

    Yaakov Israel is among his country’s new generation of artists shaped inevitably by current events and history. Yet he is determined to reach beyond the headlines to create work that explores profound ideas and themes.

    Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art director Mark Sloan, invited to Israel two years ago to get to know visual artists at work there, met the photographer and immediately began conceiving an exhibit, now on the walls of one of the two galleries. (The other has photographs by Kathleen Robbins.) Israel will be in town to give a free gallery talk at 7 p.m. Tuesday. The event is co-sponsored by the Halsey and the Yaschik/Arnold Jewish Studies Program.

    The Post and Courier took the opportunity to ask Israel about his work.

    FULL STORY »

    Local organizations band together for Banned Books Week | Sun. Sep. 7, 2014

    Post & Courier

    Charleston Friends of the Library is taking the lead in organizing a free public reading meant to commemorate the freedom to read and condemn censorship.

    At 6 p.m. Sept. 22, during Banned Books Week, some of the area’s leading writers and artists will read from books that have been subject to censorship attempts. Readers include Marcus Amaker, Herb Frazier, Sharon Graci, Bret Lott, Theodore Rosengarten, Joy Vandervort-Cobb, Marjory Wentworth and Katherine Williams.

    The event will take place at the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art, 161 Calhoun St., on the College of Charleston campus. Rosengarten will read from Allen Ginsberg’s “Howl.” Lott, who’s own writing has been subject to challenge from censors, will read from “Catcher in the Rye.”

    FULL STORY »

    “Oppressive Flatness” With Kathleen Robbins’ Into the Flatlands | Wed. Sep. 3, 2014

    Cistern Yard

    Echoing her grandmother’s words, Kathleen Robbins said, “I felt possessed by the place just as much as I possessed it.”  This place is the Mississippi family farm Robbins grew up on, and the centerpiece of her photo collection Into the Flatlands, on display now in the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art.

    FULL STORY »

    Community Partners 2014