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Adjunct art instructor Rachel Boillot was recently chosen as one of the 56 artists included in The Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art at the College of Charleston’s project “Southbound: Photographs of and about the New South.”

Southbound is the largest exhibition ever produced of photographers capturing the American South in the twenty-first century. The exhibition presents multiple ways of visualizing the region.

After its debut in Charleston, “Southbound” will travel nationally, including stops in Raleigh and Durham, North Carolina; Chattanooga, Tennessee; Meridian, Mississippi; and Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

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Kathleen Robbins isn’t exactly sure what “the new South” is, but as one of 56 photographers displaying work in the “Southbound: Photographs of and about the New South” exhibit at the College of Charleston, she’s helping to try to define it.

“Southbound” is the largest exhibition ever produced of photographs of and about the American South in the 21st century, and strives to present multiple ways of visualizing the region.

The project’s purpose is to investigate the senses of place in the South that congeal, however fleetingly, in the spaces between the photographers’ looking, their images, and preexisting ideas about the region.

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The contractors were long gone, but Fahamu Pecou wanted to put the finishing touches on his new studio himself.

On a recent, frigid afternoon, he rolled polyurethane across the concrete floors of the sprawling space, a converted warehouse in Atlanta’s West End neighborhood. With his wife, Jamila, he set up brushes, paints and pencils. He was proud of the building with its crisp white walls and pitch-black ceiling, the first studio he has owned in his 20-year career.

Back in September, a massive fire gutted the studio he was renting in Inman Park. Flames claimed his art supplies, his memorabilia documenting his career. He also lost four works in progress, which were to have been late additions to his multimedia show, “Do or Die: Affect, Ritual, Resistance.” Fortunately, the bulk of the show was out on national tour at the time of the fire, which is being investigated as arson. The exhibition is currently on view at the Michael C. Carlos Museum at Emory University.

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Local photographer participates in regional project

Wed Feb 06, 2019
Mebane Enterprise

A local photographer living in Mebane, Chris Sims, recently participated in a unique collection of photographs titled Southbound: Photographs of and About the New South. 

The photography has been on display at the Halsey Institute in Charleston, South Carolina since October, and will continue to be on display until early March. The display will come to N.C. State and Duke Universities next year. 

Sims was born in Michigan and raised in Atlanta, Georgia. He has an undergraduate degree in history from Duke University, a master’s degree in visual communication from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and a M.F.A. in studio art from the Maryland Institute College of Art. He worked as a photo archivist at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C. and currently is the Undergraduate Education Director at the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University. At Duke he also teaches in the Duke-in-Berlin summer program and in the MFA in Experimental and Documentary Arts graduate program.

 

Sims made his way to Mebane approximately twenty years ago for a meeting with another photographer, and fell in love with the charm of this small community. He is honored to be a part of this special photography project. 

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Three Perfect Days: Charleston

Fri Feb 01, 2019
Hemispheres

Back in 1874, The Atlanta Daily Herald’s Henry W. Grady coined the term “the New South” to encourage people to move beyond the fraught antebellum period and see the region in a fresh light, “thrilling with the consciousness of growing power and prosperity.”

We check into our new digs, The Dewberry, a hip Mid-Century Modern–style hotel that opened in 2016 in a former 1960s federal building, and while all we want to do is take a nap, we rally and cross Marion Square to The Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art at the College of Charleston. I’m eager to see the current exhibit, Southbound: Photographs of and About the New South, which runs through March and features images taken by 56 21st-century artists exploring their perceptions of the American South. The variety is astounding. There are shots of Civil War reenactors, Black Lives Matter marches, empty storefronts, migrant workers, and high school homecoming queens. Seeing all these snippets of life makes me think that there’s not just one South—it’s impossible to generalize about or judge such a wide swath of our country. 

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Southern Testaments

TOWN Magazine

For more than a century, photographers have documented the American South in its pleasantries, unrest, and eccentricities, many times with a focus on the people of a region where romantic traditions prevail. The Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art opens a new window on the South with a collection that merges this past with present in the exhibition Southbound: Photographs of and about the New South, which is also showing at the City Gallery at Waterfront Park in Charleston.

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After first setting foot in Madison County in the early 1970s, documentary photographer Rob Amberg became so immersed in the Appalachian culture of the rural Western North Carolina community that he missed out on much of the music that shaped wider popular culture of the time.

“The last two months, I’ve been listening nonstop to Queen and Freddie Mercury,” Amberg said during an interview on land in Madison’s PawPaw community, where he’s lived with his wife Leslie for the past 30 years.

“I’ve been telling my friends that I’m listening to him and they kind of say, ‘What?!’ And, well, think about it, when he was at his height, I’m here listening to (Madison County native and old time music legend) Dellie Norton and ballads and missing Led Zeppelin and all these things that were out there.”

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In 2015, Stacy Kranitz was named Instagram photographer of the year by Time magazine. She’s in high demand at domestic and international publications, from New York Times Magazine to Adbusters, Mother Jones, Intercept, Stern, Vice, Oxford American and others.

She earned a bachelor’s in photography and lm from New York University and a master’s in photography from University of California, Irvine.

Kranitz, 42, was born in Frankfort but was only here about nine months. Her father, Jerry Kranitz, managed a Big K store. The family owned a chain of stores sometimes referred to as Kuhn’s Variety Store. Her mother, Barbra Kranitz, was a preschool teacher.

She says her parents lived in Frankfort about a year and a half and they’re now retired, living in Delray Beach, Florida.

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Huntington Station native Lucas Foglia is documenting an evolving vision of the South with his photographs that depict a modern counterculture movement.

Having grown up on his family’s Fox Hollow Farms, Foglia has been drawn to nature and sustainability from a young age. After receiving a degree in art from Brown University and MFA in photography from Yale University, Foglia hit the road in the South finding families who live self-sufficiently. Like Foglia’s family, who grew a major portion of their food and bartered their goods with others in exchange for local products and service, these families rely on themselves for their own sustenance.

“The lifestyle we had was a mixture of agriculture and suburbia,” Foglia said. “When I went to photograph in the South East, the people I met were living with the same value system that I grew up with, but to more of an absolute.”

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Cinelle Barnes draws the layout of her childhood home on the board, adding in a few details, explaining that the exercise permits one to revisit formative moments and recall early emotions.

“Can you guess what this is?” she asks.

“A chandelier?” one of the students ventures.

Another room is drawn.

“Can you guess what this is?”

“A disco ball!” comes the reply.

“And this?”

“Is it a bar?”

Now the students are curious about this house in the Philippines that contains such things. Barnes continues, drawing a fancy chair at the head of a large table otherwise surrounded by stools. It’s the chair her mother sat in, she explains.

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