Free For All
GALLERY HOURS (during exhibitions)
Thursday & Friday, 11am – 4pm
EDU BLOG
We asked our intern Marian Williams to complete one of the activities in our Teaching Resource packet created for the "Dis/placements: Revisitations of Home" virtual project. Marian chose this prompt: “Out in the Open: Create a series of four or five photographs to document a facet of your community usually kept out of view that you want to bring to attention. For example, you might identify police searching or interrogating young people in your neighborhood, restaurant workers who work in kitchens behind closed doors, or domestic workers who clean offices and private homes. Consider why the activities portrayed in your photos are often done out of view. Why is it important for you to bring this out into the open? Record your opinion in an artist statement to share alongside your photographs.”
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Over the next few weeks, we invite readers to try some of the suggested activities from our Displacements Education packet, a resource meant for children and adults to utilize either at home or in the classroom. This week’s activity is a paper bag house and is suitable for children ages three and older.
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We asked our intern Marian Williams to complete one of the activities in our Teaching Resource packet created for the Dis/placements: Revisitations of Home virtual project. Marian chose this prompt: "Describe and Draw It: Think about your home, your neighborhood, and your community. If you drew everything that came to your head, what would you be drawing right now?"
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A common theme throughout Moon’s collection is a juxtaposition of American and East Asian cultures. As the essay points out, the work may appear to be Asian yet is focused on America. A prime example of this is the use of fortune cookies, something people frequently associate with Chinese food, yet rarely appears outside of the United States. In her work, it seems she examines American projections and assumptions of exoticism by taking common tropes, such as the Chinese takeout box and the fortune cookie, and using those as a medium and a vehicle to display Korean folklore and symbolism. 
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Dr. Fahamu Pecou, an Atlanta based artist who focuses on the Black male in America, speaks to the notion of home through his grav·i·ty series (2013-2014). Pecou encourages the viewer to reflect upon fashion as an art form and how it connects with Black American culture. Additionally, with the artistic use of dress and style, one can express their character, culture, and history. In other words, dress can represent a piece of home.
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Wrote the poet John Ashbery, “The room I entered was a dream of this room. / Surely all those feet on the sofa were mine.” It is this uncanny merging of past and present, this sense of déjà vu, that lends Tanja Softić’s Night Blooms series its unique power. In Softić’s work, present and future grow out of the past: remnants of previous eras are visible everywhere, memory mixes with present experience, and the motion of time is not linear, but a series of superimpositions. Should we dig through the new growth of any present, or any budding future, we will find a past beneath it: a past, for Softić, that contains the memory of a lost homeland.
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For the 2019 exhibition Linked, the Halsey Institute commissioned a short film on artist Colin Quashie. Madeleine Mitchell introduces it here.
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For her 2019 exhibition, Over There and Here is Me and Me, Katrina Andry used for research a report called The State of Racial Disparities in Charleston County, South Carolina 2000-2015, written by Dr. Stacey Patton for the Race and Social Justice Initiative at the College of Charleston. Anna Crowley profiles it here.
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For her 2019 exhibition Cry Joy Park–Gardens of Dark and Light, Jennifer Wen Ma created a series of community dinners called An Invitation to the Feast, held in the exhibition. Madelayne Abel writes about them here.
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This week’s art activity of 10/10—Reflections on a Decade of Exhibitions is the last in this series. We’re taking a closer look at Cry Joy Park—Gardens of Dark and Light, a solo exhibition by artist Jennifer Wen Ma, which examines issues of social justice and the difficulty of reconciling opposing forces in our society. The balance of light and dark reminds us that we need both utopian and dystopian qualities in society. For this simple at-home project, we encourage readers to learn more about the balance of light and dark !
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Free For All
GALLERY HOURS (during exhibitions)
Tuesday - Friday, 11am – 4pm
Open until 7pm on Thursdays
843.953.4422

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