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GALLERY HOURS (during exhibitions)
Monday – Saturday, 11am – 4pm
Open until 7pm on Thursdays
EDU BLOG
As a child, my answers to the question "What do you want to be when you grow up?" unequivocally revealed my Southern, or more aptly Texan, upbringing. I would be a cowgirl, or a racecar driver, depending on the day.

As an adult I spent some time New York, where people regarded anything between New York or LA—with the occasional admittance of Chicago—as inconsequential flyover country. Texas was among these unremarkable origins. Doubly so was South Carolina, where my parents and I moved when I was in elementary school. Despite being Texans, we quickly realized that before living in South Carolina, we had barely skimmed the surface of what it means to be Southern. There seemed to be about a dozen types of Baptist, and a lot of them were the "wrong kind." Teenagers sported confederate flags without batting an eye. And it seemed that the majority of people would rather ding their cars daily on pot holes than see a half a cent sales tax increase.
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Kyle Ford is one of the many talented photographers in the exhibition Southbound: Photographs of and about the New South. He is a Hong-Kong based photographer. His series is a collection of photographs that investigate how we perceive, represent, and interact with the natural world.
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In the exhibition Southbound: Photographs of and about the New South, Daniel Beltrá’s Oil Spill photographs contextualize the complex nature of the American South with natural resources. America’s agricultural community has been one of its greatest assets and one that is historically rooted in society’s traditional Southern lifestyle today. However, along with advances in technology in urban areas, the South has also seen the effects of America’s Industrial Revolution with its booming oil industry. At its peak, a rapid search for oil along with the gold rush redefined the South’s relationship between man and nature through translating America’s natural resources into the culture of mass production.
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Old vs New South

Tue Dec 11, 2018
As William Faulkner said, “The past is never dead. It’s not even past.” This sentiment rings especially true in the South. The Southbound project is an interesting one, for it is photography of and about the “New South.” The photos are all taken after the year 2000, but what does the idea of the “New South” really mean?
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Langdon Clay is a New York native who relocated to Sumner, Mississippi with his wife and fellow photographer, Maude Schuyler Clay. Clay’s New York origins give him a unique perspective into the South. His exploration of Southern values is rooted in the people of the South and the mark they leave on the natural world. In the mini-film that accompanies the Halsey Institute’s exhibition Southbound: Photographs of and about the New South, Clay explains his desire to “get as much information as possible” from a single photograph, so for as long as it may last, its viewers will receive its message. As a self-proposed “Yankee” in the American South, Clay aims to “absent [himself] from the process” and serve as a “conduit” in order to present an honest portrait of the South he observes.
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After learning the history of McNair Evans’s Confessions for a Son series, I was immediately drawn to the photograph Christmas Morning, 2009 in the exhibition Southbound: Photographs of and about the New South. The series is a collection of images taken shortly after Evans father had passed. This particular image was captured at his grandmother’s home in North Carolina on Christmas Morning. The scene depicts an abandoned game of solitaire Evans’s mother had been playing the previous evening.
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Southbound: Photographs of and about the New South is a groundbreaking photography exhibition that provides fresh perspectives of the culture that constitutes today’s New South. It is composed of fifty-six photographers who have confronted and redefined the preconceived notions and stereotypes that come along with the region. One specific artist featured in Southbound who stands out is Kyle Ford. Ford is a Hong Kong-based photographer who explores how humans interface with the natural world. One of his images in particular, Shamu, Seaworld Florida, 2009 captures American commercialism and the world’s largest industry: tourism.
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As a naturalist, John James Audubon was responsible for the discovery of many North American birds. He was a trailblazer in his scientific findings, as well as in his approach to drawing from life. Audubon was exploring the United States and documenting birds that no one else had documented. Every new chirp or song could signal a new bird, a species no one had ever recorded- or possibly even seen before. There are, in fact, several birds painted and explained in The Birds of America that are not actual species. Some are female birds that look different from the males, others are immature birds mistaken for new species.
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Audubon and the Lowcountry

Wed Sep 19, 2018
Famed ornithologist John James Audubon developed a peculiar love of nature and drawing at an early age, an interest that melded art with natural science and proved integral to the development of both fields in the United States. Raised in Nantes, France, Audubon moved to America in 1803 to manage Mill Grove, his father’s plantation near Philadelphia. This was the first of many residencies across the United States—from Kentucky to Louisiana to Ohio—where Audubon brought his drawing practice and goal of eventually publishing a compendium of all of the birds of North America.[2] In 1831, Audubon took what would be a decades-long project, and his magnum opus, to Charleston.
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In his shadowbox Wood Duck (Dance for Nola), 2017, Hitnes focuses on the condition of the bird’s environment and how it has changed from John James Audubon’s era—the early 19th century. In John James Audubon’s Summer or Wood Duck, three birds are depicted nestled in tree branches while a fourth flies in from the left-hand side. The birds are coupled together and noticeably interact with each other and their environment. While Hitnes depicts the same species in his shadowbox paintings, his environment is an antithesis of Audubon’s.
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Free For All
GALLERY HOURS (during exhibitions)
Monday – Saturday, 11am – 4pm
Open until 7pm on Thursdays
843.953.4422


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