Free For All
GALLERY HOURS (during exhibitions)
Monday – Saturday, 11am – 4pm
Open until 7pm on Thursdays
EDU BLOG
This month, interns at the Halsey Institute will be interviewing artists in Young Contemporaries. This series features students interviewing their peers, investigating aspects behind some of the works in the Young Contemporaries 2018 exhibition. In this post, Maddie Stauss interviews artist Nori Page.
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This month, interns at the Halsey Institute will be interviewing artists in Young Contemporaries. This series features students interviewing their peers, investigating aspects behind some of the works in the Young Contemporaries 2018 exhibition. In this post, María Carrillo-Marquina interviews artist Timothy Hunter.
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This month, interns at the Halsey Institute will be interviewing artists in Young Contemporaries. This series features students interviewing their peers, investigating aspects behind some of the works in the Young Contemporaries 2018 exhibition. In this post, Chloe Gillespie interviews artist Hope Morgan.
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Born into post-revolutionary Havana, where he continues to live and work today, Roberto Diago has always drawn inspiration from the socialist propaganda of his surroundings. “Here in Cuba,” Diago has explained, “you see a lot of big billboards advertising unity and solidarity for the common good. I think that’s cool, and I told myself that I could also propagandize for things I feel.” This realization first manifested in the form of a graffiti-inspired style which, like his current approach, sought to spark discourse around the racist residue of slavery in Cuba.
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A bilingual exhibition

Tue Feb 27, 2018
La historia recordada by Roberto Diago translates into English as “The Remembered History,” a title that purely encapsulates what the work is Diago’s work is about. Diago is an Afro-Cuban artist from Havana, Cuba, whose works present a personal uprising that ignite a conversation about the racial identity of Cuba. Diago largely works with found materials such as metals, oil drums, and wood because those materials resonate with the people of Cuba, as such objects are commonly seen in neighborhoods around Havana. Much of his work is abstracted to disguise its true content of his commentary of the racial oppression and divide in Cuba. With the inclusion of bilingual components in the exhibition, La historia recordada allows for a wider reach for those who don’t speak English; furthermore, individuals fluent in English and Spanish may have an enriched experience by comparing the translations and their connections to the work on view.
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Choosing local

Mon Nov 27, 2017
The work of Aurora Robson and Chris Jordan are disparate, but they both leave an impact. They open up audiences’ eyes to the magnitude of the amount of plastics being discarded and the overarching consequences it is having on our environment. Coral acidification, animal suffering, and air pollution – just to name a few. The experience of their artwork left me searching for ways to reduce my plastic use. It also urged me to search for ways to nurture our Earth, analyzing our systems of sustainability as a whole.
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The College of Charleston has been working to increase students’ understanding of sustainability and solidifying a movement to inspire the entire campus. This fall, the Halsey Institute teamed up with the South Carolina Aquarium to bring awareness of the problems of plastic consumption and waste with an exhibition called SEA CHANGE, which is sponsored by the Office of Sustainability, the Quality Enhancement Plan, and others. The exhibition features Aurora Robson: The Tide is High and Chris Jordan: Midway, whose works highlight the problems within our consumer culture, specifically the plastic pollution that fills our oceans.
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Artists and plastics

Fri Nov 17, 2017
Now exhibiting at the Halsey Institute is Aurora Robson: The Tide is High and Chris Jordan: Midway. Aurora Robson uses pre-recycled plastics to create large scale sculptures and installations. Robson’s art prevents plastic entering into the waste stream because they are being repurposed into artwork. Her work has an organic aesthetic that further connects her projects to nature. Chris Jordan’s art concentrates on displaying the consequences of mass consumption and plastic waste through photography and collage. Jordan’s work is confronting and sets the stage for conversation about how humans are affecting the planet. Plastic pollution is a growing global crisis and both Robson and Jordan create visual forms to voice their environmental concerns.
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Tom Stanley is an artist and recently retired Professor of Fine Arts from Winthrop University, but most do not know about his earlier careers. In high school, Stanley thought he would become an engineer like his father and even took a mechanical drawing class. Stanley learned how to use triangles, straight lines, and perfect angles to create detailed blueprints. These skills are carried out through his artwork today. During his Artist Talk on June 17th, Stanley told a story about how he would stay up late into the night working at his drawing table, which he strung with holiday lights so not to wake his family. Another memory that stood out to him was drawing triangles into the lining of a jacket that his brother had given him.
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Tom Stanley’s paintings in Scratching the Surface, his solo exhibition at the Halsey Institute, carefully balance easily recognizable forms such as houses and boats with subtle references to art history by utilizing painting techniques that range from sgraffito of the ancient Greeks to drip painting methods found in abstract expressionism. By doing so, he creates contemporary art that is perfectly suited for the revitalized dialogic museum—a space defined by education through conversation and connections. Answers are neither right or wrong, but instead, visitors are encouraged to engage with the space and the art.
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Free For All
GALLERY HOURS (during exhibitions)
Monday – Saturday, 11am – 4pm
Open until 7pm on Thursdays
843.953.4422


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