ABOUT OUR FILMS

The Southern Circuit Tour of Independent Filmmakers brings free screenings of independent film and their filmmakers to Charleston and provides communities across the South with a tour of highly talented independent filmmakers. Audiences have seen more than 200 films and have engaged filmmakers in post-screening discussions in more than 44 communities across the Southern United States. Southern Circuit is the nation’s only regional tour of independent filmmakers, providing communities with an interactive way of experiencing independent film.

The tour takes the audience away from their televisions, DVD players, and computers to connect them with independent filmmakers and encourage them to talk with one another about the films and their meanings. Southern Circuit transforms watching independent films from a solitary experience into a communal one. The 2013-2014 Southern Circuit films are a partnership with the College of Charleston’s First-Year Experience program.

We often present other films throughout the year, outside of Southern Circuit. Watch the website for details.

SCIF_logos

 

The Iran Job [FILM SCREENING + Q&A]
TUES, MARCH 11, 7PM
RECITAL HALL, SIMONS CENTER FOR THE ARTS, 54 ST. PHILIP STREET

Free, Rated PG-13
Q & A with the filmmaker and a reception by Brown’s Court Bakery to follow the film

Synopsis:

The documentary The Iran Job follows American basketball player Kevin Sheppard as he accepts a job to play professionally in one of the world’s most feared and misunderstood countries, Iran. With tensions running high between Iran and the West, Sheppard tries to separate sports from politics only to find that politics is impossible to escape in Iran. Along the way he forms a friendship with three outspoken Iranian women. Thanks to these women, his apartment turns into an oasis of free speech, where they discuss everything from politics to religion to gender roles.

Sheppard’s season in Iran culminates in something much bigger than basketball, the uprising and subsequent suppression of Iran’s reformist Green Movement. This is a powerful prelude to the sweeping changes across the Middle East in the wake of the Arab Spring. With the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq declared over, and the world’s attention laser-focusing on Iran again, this is a critical time to take a fresh look at Iranians. It may even be crucial in avoiding the next war in a Muslim country.

Trailer: https://vimeo.com/46447542

Finding Hillywood [FILM SCREENING + Q&A]
WED, MARCH 19, 7PM
RECITAL HALL, SIMONS CENTER FOR THE ARTS, 54 ST. PHILIP STREET

Free, Rated PG-13
Q & A with the filmmaker and a reception by Brown’s Court Bakery to follow the film

Synopsis: Finding Hillywood is a documentary about the beginning of Rwanda’s film industry, and a real life example of how art heals. In Hillywood, Rwanda’s film industry named for the country’s rolling hills, there is a blossoming film community. Set amongst these rolling hills, the film chronicles one man’s road to forgiveness, his effort to mend his country, and the realization that we all must one day face our past. As Rwanda is still recovering from a cultural genocide almost 20 years ago, cinema has become a way for artists to express themselves and create cultural discussion. The films produced in Hillywood deal with “real time” Rwandan issues— from the government releasing genocide prisoners to drug addiction, to a forbidden relationship between a Hutu and a Tutsi. Finding Hillywoods Seattle-based filmmakers have created a documentary that functions as a Rwandan history lesson but also reveals the power of art as a catalyst for cultural healing.

Trailer: https://vimeo.com/52502529

 

The New Public [FILM SCREENING + Q&A]
THURS, APRIL 17, 7PM
RECITAL HALL, SIMONS CENTER FOR THE ARTS, 54 ST. PHILIP STREET

Free, Rated PG-13
Q & A with the filmmaker and a reception by Brown’s Court Bakery to follow the film

Synopsis: In fall 2006, former DJ, point guard, and teacher turned first-time principal, Dr. James O’Brien, opened a small public high school in Bedford-Stuyvesant, Brooklyn, where one-third of residents live below the poverty line and the high school graduation rate is 40%. 

With infectious optimism, O’Brien and his team of eight undertook an unconventional approach and ambitious mission: Create a school with an arts-oriented curriculum that also emphasizes self-development, community collaboration, and social change. Initially, the buzz from the community was that this was a dream come true. But, conflicts arose when untested idealism was challenged by long-standing realities far bigger than school.

This heartfelt verité film follows the 4-year journey of the students, parents and educators striving to make a difference in the futures of young people whose lives are stark representations of our country’s education and opportunity gaps. 

Through the prism of one inner-city public school, the audience will witness complexities faced by urban public schools and communities everywhere. The story of Brooklyn Community Arts and Media High School explores issues of class, race, and culture in the contemporary battlefield of urban education. It’s a case study and a detailed map for the road ahead.

Trailer: https://vimeo.com/13823045

Community Partners 2014