PAST PRESS

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  • 2010 (18)
  • 2009 (25)
  • 2008 (13)


  • RECENT PRESS COVERAGE

    The Gaillard opens, Durfee paints cool stuff, and Charleston can’t keep its mouth shut | Wed. Dec. 30, 2015

    Charleston City Paper

    Despite the fact that December marks the middle of the year for the arts world — if we were going to get all technical, we’d do this article in June, once Spoleto closed — the approach of New Year’s Eve tends to make us think back on the cool things we saw, heard, and experienced in our local art spaces this year. So without further ado, here’s our biased, unscientific list of the greatest developments in Charleston’s art scene, in no particular order.

    FULL STORY »

    Sneak peek: Halsey debuts new exhibit, Southbound, in 2017 | Thu. Dec. 17, 2015

    Charleston City Paper

    We know, talking about 2017 is about as taboo as talking about New Year’s Eve plans (we’re scrambling for some, too). But when we glimpsed some of the images set to be used in a huge multi-media project, Southbound, co-curated by Mark Sloan, director of the Halsey, and Mark Long, professor of Political Science at CofC, we knew we had to share the project with y’all.

    FULL STORY »

    Best of 2015: Our Top 10 Exhibitions Across the United States | Wed. Dec. 16, 2015

    Hyperallergic

    We love NYC and LA and all the art they have to offer, but we know they’re only two towns of many across the country mounting great exhibitions large and small. So we tried to travel and see a lot of shows this year, even though it’s next to impossible to be comprehensive with a list like this (and we surely missed a lot). From Nick Cave’s Detroit takeover to a retrospective of the artist known as Mr. Imagination, here are our picks for the best exhibitions of 2015 across the United States.

    FULL STORY »

    The Artist as Conjurer of Illusions and Truths | Fri. Dec. 11, 2015

    hyperallergic

    There are multiple magics at work in the art of Renée Stout. As the subject of her current solo exhibition at the Wellin Museum, Stout has chosen hoodoo, or conjure, a set of African American spiritual practices often referred to as folk magic. She’s also created a worker of this magic, a conjurer named Fatima Mayfield who is Stout’s alter ego. And in her objects themselves, Stout has embedded the magic of art — a bewitching artifice — which is to say that her paintings, sculptures, prints, drawings, and photographs are so carefully constructed and so authentically felt they conjure and sustain their own reality.

    FULL STORY »

    REVIEW: PURE’s Failure: A Love Story is a heartwarming and humorous show | Wed. Nov. 11, 2015

    Charleston City Paper

    Spoiler alert: The three daughters of the Fail family, Nelly, Jenny June, and Gertie all die in PURE Theatre’s play, Failure: A Love Story. Well, actually, it’s not a spoiler because they announce this fact in the beginning refrain, even including the cause of deaths: “blunt object, disappearance, and consumption,” respectively. Surely this cannot make for an uplifting love story. On the contrary, this latest PURE production is entirely heartwarming, largely due to a splendid cast, innovative choreography, and scintillating set design.

    FULL STORY »

    LONNIE HOLLEY | Thu. Nov. 5, 2015

    Art in America

    Simply stated, Lonnie Holley’s exhibition at the Halsey soared. The approximately 40 sculptures were selected from the collection of William S. Arnett and the Atlanta-based Souls Grown Deep Foundation, which Arnett founded, as well as the African-American artist’s own collection. Elegantly curated by Halsey director Mark Sloan, “Something to Take My Place,” titled after a 2008 sculpture of nearly the same name, focused on discrete objects—solos rather than a choir, dazzling though the artist’s environments can be.

    FULL STORY »

    Lonnie Holley’s Object Lessons | Mon. Nov. 2, 2015

    Brut Force

    A brilliantly resourceful artist’s timely exhibition at Charleston, South Carolina’s Halsey Gallery is the latest development in a remarkable career

    Like most solo exhibitions by widely known contemporary artists, Lonnie Holley’s “Something to Take My Place” was scheduled more than two years before it opened. But its timing and location turned out to be more appropriate than anyone could have predicted. The compelling show of Holley’s raggedly assertive, socially engaged sculptures was on view in the Halsey Gallery at the College of Charleston, South Carolina, from late August into early October 2015. This placed it chronologically between two events destined to cast a long historical shadow in South Carolina and the rest of the nation–the massacre in one of Charleston’s oldest black churches on June 17, and a millennial flood that struck that city and much of the state in early October.

    FULL STORY »

    New exhibits at the Halsey combine the present with the past | Wed. Oct. 21, 2015

    Charleston City Paper

    It’s impossible to separate the past from the present. As we go throughout our day, memories shape and color much of how we perceive the world around us. At the same time, traditions are recast to better fit the modern world. These are the concepts that unite the works of Susan Klein and Jiha Moon, which will be on display at the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art from Oct. 23 to Dec. 5. The final exhibits of the gallery’s 2015 season, the art of Klein and Moon combine the old and the new to create two compelling collections that challenge the viewer.

    FULL STORY »

    Lonnie Holley’s Legacy, at the Halsey Institute in Charleston | Wed. Sep. 30, 2015

    Burnaway

    Artist and musician Lonnie Holley (b. 1950, Birmingham, Alabama) said that people like him offer alternative ways of “making, thinking, living, and being.” He then asks himself has he done enough? If the works on view in his impressive and challenging solo at the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art are any indication, he has done quite a lot. And it’s only a fraction of his prodigious output since the early 1990s, when he first became seriously engaged in art, after carving headstones for two of his sisters after their untimely death (he comes from an improbable family of 27 siblings and has 16 children of his own). If it is not enough, it is only in the sense that he’s not done; objects continue to pour from his miraculous, be-ringed hands as if from a spigot on full blast.

    FULL STORY »

    Southern Masters: Lonnie Holley | Fri. Sep. 18, 2015

    Garden & Gun

    With a gift for seeing meaning in the things others throw away, Lonnie Holley is showing the art world that beauty is where you find it. 

    “This is the smallest thread,” Lonnie Holley says, holding up one red fiber, as thin as a hair. “It can matter.” He lets go and the string blows in the wind, part of a mobile Holley has sculpted from a coat hanger, a root, the lid of a tin can, and two seashells glued together. It hangs outside of an Atlanta storefront that was once a pizza parlor, among other things, but now serves as Holley’s art studio. The doors are open to an interior so filled with found material—Styrofoam, animal bones, tree roots, two old radios, stacks of stone, a web of wires strung from the ceiling—that some of it is tumbling out the door. It’s just trash, waiting to be picked up.

    FULL STORY »

    We witnessed Lonnie Holley’s genius firsthand this weekend | Wed. Sep. 16, 2015

    Charleston City Paper

    Found object artist’s Halsey exhibition “Something to Take My Place” is on view until Oct. 10, but that doesn’t mean the artist is laying back admiring his work. Instead, Holley stopped by the Marion Square Farmers Market this weekend and we got a look at the man behind the work.

    FULL STORY »

    Lonnie Holley w/ Ben Sollee & InfinitiKiss at Charleston Music Hall | Wed. Sep. 16, 2015

    Moultrie News

    Photo Gallery

    FULL STORY »

    Something to Take My Place: The Art of Lonnie Holley at the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art | Fri. Sep. 11, 2015

    Daily Serving

    “I am an artist of America,” declared Lonnie Holley during a talk for the opening of his exhibition at the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art in Charleston, South Carolina. This self-identification was Holley’s response to being labeled a folk artist throughout his career. While the visibility of his work may have suffered due to this label—his most recent solo museum show was in 1994—Holley proves himself in this exhibition as a capable and provocative artist with a large body of work.

    FULL STORY »

    Lonnie Holley’s visionary found-object assemblage comes to roost at the Halsey | Wed. Aug. 26, 2015

    Charleston City Paper

    Artist and musician Lonnie Holley has lived a life so rich in metaphor that, after learning something of his biography, one finds oneself wondering: Can it possibly all be true? Or is Holley just better at seeing the symbolism, the universal connections, that lie behind the thin yet often impenetrable veil of the everyday?

    Given that Holley creates his art out of what other people throw away, the latter is the safer bet.

    FULL STORY »

    Lonnie Holley, Queen Elizabeth Hall, London | Tue. Aug. 25, 2015

    Financial Times

    “I’m in London” might not sound like a promising opening line, but when half-chanted in a blues-inflected moan by Lonnie Holley, it felt laden with significance. And it was. Holley was soon conjuring the ghosts of his Alabama past, a future free of want and the spirit of mother earth with snippets of lyric, hollers, shouts and the occasional jaunty whistle.

    Holley might sound like an itinerant bluesman, albeit one with shamanistic intent, but his music tells a different tale. His keyboards combine jangly textures and stark arpeggios, splayed chords and one-note riffs to reach back into the past but, like Sun Ra’s, they have a futuristic bent. One piece started by noting that Pluto was “a place in space that once was a planet, but now isn’t a planet at all”. It went on to conjure illicit stills and earthquakes, whales and the Great Spirit.

    FULL STORY »

    “Something To Take My Place,” The art of Lonnie Holley opening reception at The Halsey Institute | Fri. Aug. 21, 2015

    Charleston Magazine

    The Party: The Halsey Institute hosted an opening reception for American artist and musician Lonnie Holley and his exhibition, “Something To Take My Place.” His first solo museum exhibition since 1994, the gallery showcased 40 of Holley’s works since the early 1990s, with an emphasis on his recent work. His work will be on view in the Institute through October 10.

    Highlight: Rusted pipes, tattered cloth, and weathered pieces of wood spontaneously assembled formed a collection of beautifully-made, inspiring narrative sculptures.

    Overheard: “I like all of it—every piece. His work is so very powerful.” 

    FULL STORY »

    The art of endurance: Lonnie Holley’s improvised sculptures at the Halsey Institute | Sun. Aug. 16, 2015

    Post & Courier

    What can a young boy who grows up black, poor and abused in Birmingham, Ala., do but dig up worms and search for interesting-looking junk to occupy his senses?

    What happens to a boy with a forcefully curious mind and the wherewithal to forge deep pathways into his imagination to escape, and then confront on his own terms, the ugliness and violence that surrounds him?

    FULL STORY »

    Halsey Institute’s Bizarre Bazaar was Wonderfully Weird | Mon. Aug. 10, 2015

    Charleston Grit

    One of the first things I learned about my girlfriend is that she owns a mermaid skeleton.

    It used to sit on her shelf on a vintage scale, far too small to be what one would expect a mermaid to look like, in all its feigned wonder and crypto-zoological glory. This small curio would not be found in just any home, but somehow it has now landed in the house we share together….sitting…waiting…

    FULL STORY »

    Haggle for the arts | Fri. Aug. 7, 2015

    Charleston City Paper

    The Halsey Institute is running out of space in their storage room and has decided to sell some of the items they have accumulated over the course of 31 years at their first annual BIZARRE Bazaar. With almost 100 works of art for sale, this event is an ideal opportunity for art collector to come check out paintings, sculptures, a dried grass suit, a piece made of bottle caps, and more.

    FULL STORY »

    Snap up art finds at Halsey Institute’s first Bizarre Bazaar | Thu. Aug. 6, 2015

    Charleston Scene

    The College of Charleston’s Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art has consistently presented some of the finest contemporary art and artists in Charleston.

    The institute is the type of artistic space that garners national attention while also reinforcing Charleston’s “local” aesthetic. After all, the “Buy Local” mantra doesn’t just apply to food and local business endeavors, it applies to art galleries, as well, a vital part of Charleston’s thriving personality.

    FULL STORY »

    Alyson Shotz: Force of Nature at the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art | Wed. Jul. 8, 2015

    The desire to create forms via chance and natural phenomena is reflected in the works in Alyson Shotz: Force of Nature at Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art in Charleston, South Carolina. Despite a disparate range of formats, including porcelain sculpture, complex wire installations, and color aquatints, this exhibition brings together a wide array of works that originate from a process-based practice and share connections to indeterminacy.

    FULL STORY »

    Local Arts in Brief for June 28, 2015 | Sun. Jun. 28, 2015

    Post & Courier

    Bloomberg Philanthropies has named the city of Spartanburg as one of four recipients of a public art grant worth up to $1 million. The collaborative, neighborhood-based art project, called “Seeing Spartanburg in a New Light,” will feature the work of light and digital media artist Erwin Redl. It is curated by Mark Sloan of the Halsey Institute for Contemporary Art.

    FULL STORY »

    F. Scott Hess: Art and Autobiography | Fri. Jun. 26, 2015

    Artbound

    F. Scott Hess is one of Los Angeles’s — and indeed America’s — most unique and prolific figurative painters working today. Deeply influential, frequently controversial and yet profoundly under-recognized, Hess’s emotionally fraught, allegorical narratives have captured the attention of audiences and collectors for decades with their stylized archetypes of modern human experience that combine private iconography with the stylistic aesthetic stance and elevated craftsmanship of classical art history.

    FULL STORY »

    Visual Arts: Don’t miss ‘Forces of Nature’ at the Halsey Institute | Thu. Jun. 25, 2015

    Charleston Scene

    With the Piccolo Spoleto Festival in the rearview and the summer solstice just a few days behind us, no one could blame the crowds for lying low and seeking respite in air-conditioned living rooms. But sitting in the air conditioning for too long can create an unintended brain freeze of catastrophic proportions.

    FULL STORY »

    Perception Disrupted: Alyson Shotz | Thu. Jun. 25, 2015

    Burnaway

    The Spoleto season in Charleston is a magical time. For three weeks the city is flooded with performers of all stripes and tourists looking to ride the wave of Spoleto Festival USA. School is out for the summer, Memorial Day opens the beach season, and it’s not even beastly hot yet.

    FULL STORY »

    Art and science: Alyson Shotz is thinking about gravity and glaciers and light | Sat. Jun. 13, 2015

    Post & Courier

    Brooklyn-based sculptor Alyson Shotz has shown her artwork in more than 100 exhibitions over three decades. Her pieces have been displayed in The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art and The Whitney Museum, among other prestigious institutions.

    FULL STORY »

    Alyson Shotz examines the intersection of science and art | Wed. May. 20, 2015

    Charleston City Paper

    When patrons walk into the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art’s exhibition space during Piccolo Spoleto this year, they’ll be greeted by more than 50 of sculptor Alyson Shotz’ ethereal, category-defying works. According to Halsey director Mark Sloan, this exhibition, Alyson Shotz: Force of Nature — which is jointly presented by the Halsey and Hamilton College in New York — will be Shotz’ biggest, most ambitious show to date. Among the pieces it includes are large-scale sculptures, a wall drawing, and animation.

    FULL STORY »

    Top East Coast Exhibits of Spring | Wed. Apr. 8, 2015

    Art Business News

    Young Contemporaries: Annual Student Exhibition
    April 4 – May 2
    Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art, Charleston, South Carolina
    The brightest stars of the College of Charleston’s School of the Arts show off their work in this annual exhibition.

    FULL STORY »

    Film curator to screen vintage educational films at Charleston Music Hall | Wed. Apr. 8, 2015

    The Post and Courier Charleston Scene

    A historic preservationist in his own right, film curator Skip Elsheimer should feel right at home during his film screening at the Charleston Music Hall this week. In the 1990s, Elsheimer cultivated more than 25,000 16 mm educational films, most of which he rescued from the trash bins at schools and libraries around the country. They’re stored in Raleigh at the A/V Geeks Educational Film Archive, which was established by Elsheimer.

    Now, he spends most of his time touring the country, showing the films that many institutions have deemed useless and irrelevant. And for that, he’s sort of a hero.

    FULL STORY »

    Young Contemporaries | Wed. Apr. 1, 2015

    Her Campus

    All month long, you will have the opportunity to view some of College of Charleston’s best student art. The Young Contemporaries Exhibit will be in the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art housed in the College of Charleston’s Marion and Wayland H. Cato Center for the Arts from April 4th to May 2nd.

    College of Charleston students had the opportunity to submit recent works of art, and from the submissions, the best were selected to be displayed in the Halsey Center for this exhibition. You can expect to find submissions in the form of paintings, sculptures, photographs, and prints.

    FULL STORY »

    30th Annual Young Contemporaries Exhibition Opening | Mon. Mar. 30, 2015

    College of Charleston Today

    The opening reception for the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art’s 30th annual Young Contemporaries exhibition is 5 to 7 p.m. on Friday, April 3, 2015 at the Halsey Institute, 161 Calhoun Street. The awards ceremony is at 6 p.m. The event, which includes complimentary refreshments and hors d’oeuvres, is free and open to the public.

    Juried by Philadelphia-based visiting artist Lawren Alice, the exhibition represents the brightest talents coming out of the College’s School of the Arts – including painters, sculptors, printmakers and photographers. Of the 502 submissions by 143 students, these 66 student works will be on display in the Halsey Institute galleries through May 2, 2015.

    FULL STORY »

    Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art | Fri. Feb. 13, 2015

    If You Were Mayor

    While technically the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art is part of the College of Charleston, it plays a significant role in Charleston’s vibrant art scene. Mark Sloan has overseen more than 100 exhibitions (plus an annual Young Contemporaries exhibit that features a curated collection of work by CofC students) during his 20-year stint as Chief Curator and Director.

    Mark, we’ll began our conversation with the organization’s mission and how that relates to making the arts an important part of life (and livability) in Charleston.

    The mission was developed over several months, so I really need to share it in its entirety:

    The Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art at the College of Charleston School of the Arts provides a multidisciplinary laboratory for the production, presentation, interpretation, and dissemination of ideas by innovative visual artists from around the world. As a non-collecting museum, we create meaningful interactions between adventurous artists and diverse communities within a context that emphasizes the historical, social, and cultural importance of the art of our time.

    FULL STORY »

    Dodging the Viet Cong, watching Mr. Bonetangles, and eating wings | Thu. Feb. 5, 2015

    Charleston City Paper

    That night, we had dinner at Rue de Jean before sliding next door to the Charleston Music Hall for the Groundhog Day Concert fundraiser. The Halsey Institute presented an evening with some of Charleston’s best musicians. We’re sure that everyone on stage could play the accordion like a champ even if they had never picked one up before — all of which left us wondering what we did in college. It was en route to the concessions stand when we remembered.

    The concert opened with a marionette performance from puppeteer Will Schutze (of Mr. Bonetangles fame) that seemed like a live-action Tim Burton movie. Then the musicians took the stage. The standouts were definitely Michael Flynn and Lindsay Holler. The entire performance seemed well-rehearsed but off-the-cuff, a great little show. And we would have stayed through the entire final song if we hadn’t thought the front row was romancing the idea to mosh.

    FULL STORY »

    Charleston Music Hall hosts Halsey benefit concert | Tue. Feb. 3, 2015

    Cistern Yard

    Last Saturday night, music poured out of the Charleston Music Hall, as the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art hosted their annual Groundhog Day benefit concert. Groundhog Day, according to Halsey director Mark Sloan, is a vastly overlooked holiday that deserves a bit of appreciation and attention. Singer and guitarist, and somewhat host of the night, Bill Carson, said of the event, “”This concert is a way for the local music community to show its support for the fantastic contemporary arts programming that the Halsey Institute provides year-round, and year after year.” As the third annual benefit concert, the event helps to maintain the Halsey as a professional, entertaining and inviting art center.

    FULL STORY »

    Review: Groundhog Day Concert | Sun. Feb. 1, 2015

    Art Mag

    The 2nd annual Groundhog Day benefit concert at the Charleston Music Hall last night was full of musical magic and intrigue.  Gifted puppeteer Will Schutze opened the show with a marionette dance and song medley and the curtain opened on a fabric-draped stage with musicians and instruments cloaked in lights.  For the next three hours there was a nearly seamless progression of knockout performances, a real thrill ride for jazz-lovers, with a bent for Americana and Latin flavors.

    Musical mastermind Bill Carson put together a carefully curated and enthralling program of old and new songs written by many of the local musicians on stage or culled from his archives of personal favorites.  He tweaked arrangements to weave genres together (let’s throw some banjo in that one!) or build tension. Joel Hamilton’s now-iconic “Tourniquet” was a reprise from last year, but with noticeable changes and a twist at the end that made it oh-so-satisfying.  What Carson does with mood is brilliant.

    FULL STORY »

    Restaurant Week year ‘round – plus a Groundhog concert | Fri. Jan. 30, 2015

    Exclusive Properties

    Some creative forces will be teaming up this weekend for a concert that looks pretty interesting.  It’s the Groundhog Day Concert, and it will be happening Saturday night, January 31st at the Charleston Music Hall (37 John Street, downtown).  It’s described as an “intimate evening of music” and is spearheaded by the cool folks at the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art.  There will be music by The Opposite of a Train – Bill Carson, Nathan Koci, and Ron Wiltrout; Owen Beverly, Jack Burg, John Cobb, Michael Flynn, Clint Fore, Joel Hamilton, Kevin Hamilton, Rachel Kate Gillon, Jonathan Gray, Mark Sterbank, Lindsay Holler, and Stephanie Underhill.  There will also be a special performance by Mr. Bonetangles   –  puppeteer Will Schutze’s rising star who recently had an impressive performance in Jon Favreau’s delightful new movie, “Chef.”

    FULL STORY »

    Groundhog Day Benefit Concert | Fri. Jan. 30, 2015

    Her Campus

    This Saturday, Charleston Music Hall will host a Groundhog Day benefit concert. The concert will feature music by The Opposite of a Train (Bill Carson, Nathan Koci, and Ron Wiltrout), along with performances by Owen Beverly, Jack Burg, John Cobb, Michael Flynn, Clint Fore, Joel Hamilton, Kevin Hamilton, Lindsay Holler, Rachel Kate Gillon, Jonathan Gray, Mark Sterbank, and Stephanie Underhill. The night will also feature a special cameo performance from Mr. Bonetangles by puppeteer, Will Schutze.

    Bill Carson, the concert’s music director, says, “This concert is a way for the local music community to show its support for the fantastic contemporary arts programming that the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art provides year-round, and year after year. The Halsey often collaborates with musicians, actors, filmmakers, architects, designers, and others to create its unique multi-disciplinary offerings. The participating musicians all want to shine the spotlight on the Halsey Institute in gratitude for their dynamic and inspirational role in this community.”

    FULL STORY »

    Weekend Picks 1/30–2/1 | Thu. Jan. 29, 2015

    Charleston Grit

    Groundhog Day Concert

    Charleston Music Hall

    January 31 | 8:00 p.m. | $15–$50

    Bill Carson reassembles his cast of like-minded musical friends to share songs at this benefit for the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art. Performers will include Ron WiltroutRachel KateJoel Hamilton, Stephanie Underhill, Clint Fore, Jonathan Gray, and Jack Burg.

     

     

    FULL STORY »

    At Projective Eye Gallery, Don ZanFagna’s wild ride of vision and obsession | Thu. Jan. 29, 2015

    The Charlotte Observer

    The Pulse Dome Project, an exploration in bio-architecture, was ZanFagna’s search for a way to “grow” a house and create a structure in harmony with nature. 

    In 2009, after living in Italy, New York, California, Illinois and elsewhere, ZanFagna, with his wife, Joyce, settled in Mount Pleasant, S.C., to be closer to family. Family members approached Mark Sloan, director and senior curator of the College of Charleston’s Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art, asking him to look at ZanFagna’s work. Sloan plowed through paintings, drawings, sculptures and more, in a variety styles, but it was the Pulse Dome Project that drew him in. 

    In 2012, Sloan curated an exhibition featuring Pulse Dome, as well as work from ZanFagna’s “Cyborg Notes.”

     
     

    FULL STORY »

    Celebrate the Halsey Institute at the Annual Groundhog Day Benefit Concert | Tue. Jan. 27, 2015

    College of Charleston Today

    The Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art at the College of Charleston, in collaboration with the Charleston Music Hall, presents an evening of music featuring Charleston’s finest locally and nationally recognized musical acts on January 31, 2015 at 8 p.m. at the Charleston Music Hall (37 John St. Doors open at 7 p.m.).

    FULL STORY »

    Things to Do Sunday, January 25, 2015 | Sun. Jan. 25, 2015

    The Post and Courier

    Artist Discussion

    What: Join exhibiting artist Patricia Boinest Potter, Halsey Institute director and chief curator Mark Sloan and cognitive scientist Douglas Hofstadter for a roundtable discussion about Potter’s artwork in her exhibition Patterns of Place, currently on display at the Halsey. Potter creates artworks in the form of three-dimensional maps that she refers to as Isomorphic Map Tables and 1:1 Map Insets.

    When: 2 p.m.

    Where: Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art, 161 Calhoun St., Charleston

    Price: Free

    FULL STORY »

    Bill Carson brings friends, collaborators together for Groundhog Day concert | Sat. Jan. 24, 2015

    Post & Courier

    He’s probably not the first one you’ll notice on stage. His is a small white flame charisma, not a raging red burn.

    Bill Carson is slight, bespectacled, quiet, perfectly content to show off his friends. He stands there, unassuming, behind his twangy hollow-body guitar.

    FULL STORY »

    Patricia Boinest Potter creates abstract, multidimensional maps | Wed. Jan. 21, 2015

    Charleston City Paper

    If you were to try to describe the work of Alabama-based artist Patricia Boinest Potter, you would probably find yourself gravitating toward phrases like “three-dimensional,” “mixed media,” and “inspired by nature” — descriptors, in other words, that are solid, simple, understandable. Of course, these are also terms that tell you almost nothing.

    That’s because Potter’s work is, in truth, almost impossible to describe. She calls the pieces she creates isomorphic map tables, and they are multidimensional (multidimensional because several incorporate time as well as space) works that use materials like wood, glass, and wire to interpret a 100-square-mile area of rural Alabama, close to where Potter lives.

    FULL STORY »

    At the intersection of mapping and metaphysics | Sun. Jan. 18, 2015

    The Anniston Star

    “Patterns of Place” by Anniston artist Pat Potter is a collection of abstract three-dimensional maps, based on a 100-mile stretch of northern Alabama from Little River Canyon to Mount Cheaha. The exhibit consists of six large “map tables” and 100 smaller “map insets.”

    FULL STORY »

    Anniston artist Pat Potter is poised for national recognition | Sun. Jan. 18, 2015

    The Anniston Star

    When Pat Potter became a grandmother, she didn’t want a grandmother name like “Grandmother” or “Nana.” She wanted to be called “Magic.”

    And so she is.

    Like the alchemists of old, Pat Potter is able to transform, well, maybe not lead into gold, but ideas into substance, artifacts into art.

    FULL STORY »

    Something Unlike Anything You’ve Ever Seen Is Coming to the Halsey | Thu. Jan. 15, 2015

    The College Today

    The Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art at the College of Charleston kicks off 2015 with the Patricia Boinest Potter’s exhibit, Patterns of Place. The opening reception is on Friday, January 23, from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m., and will be open to the public and include refreshments and light hors d’oeuvres. The following day – Saturday, January 24 – there will be a gallery walkthrough with the artist at 2 p.m. There is also a curator-led walkthrough at 6 p.m. on Thursday, March 5. The exhibit will be on view until March 7, 2015.

    FULL STORY »

    Pulse Dome Project: Opening Reception | Fri. Jan. 9, 2015

    Arts at UNC Charlotte

    7:00 pm, Lecture by Curator Mark Sloan, Director of the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art
    7:30 pm, Performance by cellist Tanja Bechtler and pianist Dylan Savage

    Organized by the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art in Charleston, Pulse Dome Project: Art & Design of Don ZanFagna presents paintings, drawings, sketchbooks, and 3-D models by Don ZanFagna that explicate the futuristic and metaphoric concept of “growing” your own house. An artist, architect, and designer, ZanFagna imagined a home created, constructed, and maintained by all-organic processes and in perfect harmony with nature.

    From roughly 1971 through 1995, ZanFagna researched world indigenous structures, insect architecture, wombs, and such natural forms as caves, tunnels, and volcanoes to learn what had been done already and what was still likely to be accomplished by others in relation to sustainable human architecture. At the same time he was deeply influenced by the writings and activities of Buckminster Fuller and was captivated by Fuller’s geodesic dome.

    FULL STORY »

    Light and movement creating art | Sat. Jan. 3, 2015

    Casa Vogue (Portugal)

    Sculpture, photography, printmaking, digital collage, video or installation. For the artist Alyson Shotz the medium does not matter, but the opportunity to explore and express the themes that interest as an artist. They are diverse and involve mathematical principles, literature, computer graphics and more. 

    But it is clear that the movement and the light are a constant in his work. With a special ability to translate the passage of time in original creations, several of his works offer the viewer both a dynamic experience as contemplative.

    FULL STORY »

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