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  • RECENT PRESS COVERAGE

    Obey Giant artist picks Halsey show as top moment of 2014 | Wed. Dec. 31, 2014

    Charleston City Paper

    In a blog post today, street artist Shepard Fairey laid out his top five moments of 2014 and lo and behold: the show he did this May at the Halsey Institute for Contemporary Art was number one. The Insistent Image: Recurring Motifs in the Art of Shepard Fairey and Jasper Johns comprised not only Fairey’s prints and paintings, but also four murals and one installation in five different spots in Charleston. (Read our cover story, “Raw Power: Shepard Fairey explores empire and the American Dream this Spoleto season,” on the exhibit here.)

    FULL STORY »

    Spotlight on Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art | Wed. Dec. 10, 2014

    National Endowment for the Arts

    The Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art may be housed in a modest suite of gallery and office space on the College of Charleston campus, but its reach far exceeds its physical footprint. With a primary focus on artists “in the margins,” as Chief Curator Mark Sloan puts it, the museum shines a spotlight on artists who, given the depth, quality, and imaginative impact of their work deserve to be much better known. As we learned when we spoke with Sloan by telephone, the Halsey deploys a number of strategies to support the artists it shows.

    FULL STORY »

    Poetic arts and shadow puppets with Indonesian multimedia artist Jumaadi | Wed. Nov. 19, 2014

    Cistern Yard

    There’s something quite startling about Indonesian artist Jumaadi’s art style. Echoing the primeval cave drawing of Lascaux, or perhaps the pottery art of ancient Greece, Jumaadi captures beautifully stylized depictions of human and animal nature alike in his newest art collection,  Jumaadi: forgive me not to miss you not, on display now at the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art.

    FULL STORY »

    New exhibit opens at Halsey | Mon. Oct. 27, 2014

    Cistern Yard

    “I discover something new each time I step into the galleries.” Karen Ann Myers, Associate Directory of the Halsey, said. The mission of the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art, the Colleges’ on campus art gallery is to “provide a multidisciplinary laboratory for the production, presentation, interpretation, and dissemination of ideas by innovative visual artists from around the world.” Their latest exhibition, which opened Oct. 17, does just that featuring the work of relatively unknown Indonesian multimedia artist Jumaadi alongside one of Picassos’ lesser known collaborations Diurnes.

    FULL STORY »

    Indonesian artist Jumaadi paints in an ancient language | Wed. Oct. 15, 2014

    Charleston City Paper

    Looking at the Indonesian artist Jumaadi’s works, one is reminded of art from long, long ago: ancient Greece, perhaps, or the cave paintings of Lascaux.

    It’s not because of any similarities in style. Jumaadi’s work, which will be on display at the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art through Dec. 6, is rougher, without the formal constraints of the Greeks or the fluidity of Lascaux. Rather, it’s because Jumaadi’s visual language, like those bygone artists, is one of archetype. Rain, trees, wild beasts, and stark, disembodied human faces haunt his paintings and drawings, creating a world of primordial and universal symbols that one could devote much time, and anthropological study, to reading.

    FULL STORY »

    Jumaadi + Picasso at the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art | Fri. Sep. 26, 2014

    The Art Mag

    Beginning in October, the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art will feature Indonesian artist, Jumaadi, and his exhibition Forgive Me Not To Miss You Not.  Jumaadi has exhibited globally in Australia, Europe, Asia, the Netherlands, and he was recently selected for the Moscow Biennale.  This is a hallmark exhibition—his first in the United States.  As the Halsey’s International Artist in Residence for Fall 2014, for the past two months, Jumaadi has had the opportunity to foster a meaningful relationship with the Charleston community while developing his exhibit.

    FULL STORY »

    Best Art Galleries in Charleston | Mon. Sep. 22, 2014

    Travel + Leisure

    The history, gardens, and sea of South Carolina have long inspired a tradition of art both in Charleston and the surrounding Lowlands. In town, the annual Spoleto performing arts festival doesn’t focus on the visual arts, but still influences the city’s culture scene with shows featuring renowned dancers, singers, and actors. Year-round, painters set up plein-air easels on downtown streets to work on their harbor and marsh views. And gallery and pop-up events can be found on any block in 19th-century storefronts or diverse settings from Marion Square Park to the Old City Jail. Like a glass of wine with your art? On Friday nights, there’s likely an opening reception or two, or even a neighborhood art walk. These crawls are an easy, no-pressure way to check out what’s new on the art scene and meet some locals in a wandering crowd of Charleston’s culture-seekers. Here are a few of the best art galleries in Charleston.

    FULL STORY »

    Yaakov Israel: The Quest for the Man on the White Donkey at the Halsey Institute for Contemporary Art | Tue. Sep. 16, 2014

    Daily Serving

    In 1981, John Baldessari said, “Probably one of the worst things to happen to photography is that cameras have viewfinders…” but artist Yaakov Israel would certainly disagree.[1] Israel’s photographs in The Quest for the Man on the White Donkey at the Halsey Institute for Contemporary Art in Charleston, South Carolina, are carefully constructed. Israeli-born and -based, Israel relishes the serendipitous encounters he’s had while exploring the geography and people of his native land, and this show is a case in point: As he was packing up his equipment after a long day in the desert looking for subjects for his photographs, Israel was approached by an elderly man riding a white donkey.

    FULL STORY »

    The importance of street photography and Cheryl Dunn’s ‘Everybody Street’ | Tue. Sep. 9, 2014

    Cistern Yard

    There’s something overwhelmingly remarkable about the anatomy of a city street. Like concrete veins sprawling from a massive urban body, the streets carry with them the most vital component to the city: its lifeblood, its people.

    FULL STORY »

    Q&A with Israeli photographer Yaakov Israel | Sun. Sep. 7, 2014

    Post & Courier

    Yaakov Israel is among his country’s new generation of artists shaped inevitably by current events and history. Yet he is determined to reach beyond the headlines to create work that explores profound ideas and themes.

    Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art director Mark Sloan, invited to Israel two years ago to get to know visual artists at work there, met the photographer and immediately began conceiving an exhibit, now on the walls of one of the two galleries. (The other has photographs by Kathleen Robbins.) Israel will be in town to give a free gallery talk at 7 p.m. Tuesday. The event is co-sponsored by the Halsey and the Yaschik/Arnold Jewish Studies Program.

    The Post and Courier took the opportunity to ask Israel about his work.

    FULL STORY »

    Local organizations band together for Banned Books Week | Sun. Sep. 7, 2014

    Post & Courier

    Charleston Friends of the Library is taking the lead in organizing a free public reading meant to commemorate the freedom to read and condemn censorship.

    At 6 p.m. Sept. 22, during Banned Books Week, some of the area’s leading writers and artists will read from books that have been subject to censorship attempts. Readers include Marcus Amaker, Herb Frazier, Sharon Graci, Bret Lott, Theodore Rosengarten, Joy Vandervort-Cobb, Marjory Wentworth and Katherine Williams.

    The event will take place at the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art, 161 Calhoun St., on the College of Charleston campus. Rosengarten will read from Allen Ginsberg’s “Howl.” Lott, who’s own writing has been subject to challenge from censors, will read from “Catcher in the Rye.”

    FULL STORY »

    “Oppressive Flatness” With Kathleen Robbins’ Into the Flatlands | Wed. Sep. 3, 2014

    Cistern Yard

    Echoing her grandmother’s words, Kathleen Robbins said, “I felt possessed by the place just as much as I possessed it.”  This place is the Mississippi family farm Robbins grew up on, and the centerpiece of her photo collection Into the Flatlands, on display now in the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art.

    FULL STORY »

    Best Art Galleries in Charleston | Sat. Aug. 23, 2014

    Travel + Leisure

    The history, gardens, and sea of South Carolina have long inspired a tradition of art both in Charleston and the surrounding Lowlands. In town, the annual Spoleto performing arts festival doesn’t focus on the visual arts, but still influences the city’s culture scene with shows featuring renowned dancers, singers, and actors. Year-round, painters set up plein-air easels on downtown streets to work on their harbor and marsh views. And gallery and pop-up events can be found on any block in 19th-century storefronts or diverse settings from Marion Square Park to the Old City Jail. Like a glass of wine with your art? On Friday nights, there’s likely an opening reception or two, or even a neighborhood art walk. These crawls are an easy, no-pressure way to check out what’s new on the art scene and meet some locals in a wandering crowd of Charleston’s culture-seekers. Here are a few of the best art galleries in Charleston.

    FULL STORY »

    Four for Mark Sloan | Fri. Aug. 15, 2014

    Consulate General of Israel in Atlanta

    Four for Mark Sloan, Director and Senior Curator, Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art at the College of Charleston

    1. You were on the curators’ delegation to Israel with your peers and colleagues from the US. Can you describe that experience?

    It was my first time to Israel and it was an overwhelming experience for me and my colleagues. We didn’t know what to expect. Traveling to a country like [Israel] with such a complex, layered history, one tends to build up images in their mind. Growing up as a Protestant, I had the Bible images in my head. When I got there I saw something very different. I was very impressed by the country and the kindness of the people. I thought the quality of art was very high and exceptional. We also saw a dance troupe that was incredible. We were certainly never bored.

    FULL STORY »

    Delta Blues | Tue. Aug. 12, 2014

    www.we-heart.com

    When author James Cobb referred to the Mississippi Delta as “the most Southern place on Earth”, he obviously wasn’t talking in the geographical sense. Located in the north-west corner of the US state, the Delta is synonymous with the Deep South; although it lies at that region’s northernmost point, its people and history are rich with Southern character. The Delta is shaped in every aspect by the two rivers which enclose it on either side – the Mississippi and the Yazoo. These waterways mean the ground is extremely fertile, making it ideal for growing crops such as cotton, and many a plantation owner made their fortune in this way. The legacy of that business also left its mark on the racial and economic profiles of today’s Delta, with the stereotypical “rich white folks and poor black folks” still remarkably evident. As well as being a blessing to agriculture, the rivers can also be a curse, with an ever-present danger of flooding hanging over the Delta, and uninhabitable swampland covering swathes of the extremely flat landscape.

    FULL STORY »

    Artifacts of a Patriarchy that Was and Wasn’t | Wed. Aug. 6, 2014

    Hyperallergic

    The Paternal Suit: Heirlooms from the F. Scott Hess Family Foundation, on view at the Long Beach Museum of Art, is an exhibition that examines the influence of flawed patriarchs and fathers on American history and American families. F. Scott Hess, the impresario whose poisoned family tree is rooted in this minefield of questionable Americana, plays the role of an American Joseph Beuys: an artist/critic who re-fashions cultural relics to mythologize his own life, excoriate patriarchy, and invent alternate histories.

    FULL STORY »

    Yaakov Israel | Mon. Jun. 23, 2014

    Vogue Italia

    An interview with Yaakov Israel on his work “The Quest For the Man on the White Donkey”, which is the result of years of short trips that Yaakov undertook in the Israeli-Palestinian territory.
    Yaakov Israel, born in Jerusalem in 1974, studied Photography at the Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design and, since 2004, has been teaching photography in some of the most prestigious photography schools in Israel. Yaakov’s photography seeks to investigate the identity of his native country, the way it is mirrored and comes across in its architecture, in the landscape and its inhabitants. His is a very complex country, the traits of such complexity being clearly discernible both in its social fabric and in its territory, which bear the scars of the numerous political, cultural and religious conflicts that have been ongoing for years.

    FULL STORY »

    The Brilliant, Forgotten Futurist Who Predicted the Kindle | Mon. Jun. 2, 2014

    Wired

    Don ZanFagna is the most fascinating technological soothsayer you’ve never heard of. Last year, when the artist/architect/engineer passed away, he left behind a basement full of boxes and crates stuffed with ideas that were well ahead of their time.

    FULL STORY »

    Spoleto inspires artists and the audience | Sun. Jun. 1, 2014

    journalnow.com

    Between performances of the Gravity & Other Myths’ “A Simple Space” and Hubbard Street Dance on that same Friday, I waylaid Margaret “Tog” Newman” on Calhoun Street outside of the College of Charleston’s Halsey Institute.

    FULL STORY »

    We fell under an Obey Giant, reggae beat, and Shep Rose spell this weekend | Fri. May. 30, 2014

    Charleston City Paper

    On the way to Normandy Farm the other day, we noticed an enormous mural on the side of College Lodge, heralding the return of native son and street artist Shepard Fairey to the realm of Holy City public art. A little digging yielded a wealth of info: he’s hanging out in town, he’s doing four more murals, and he’s got more range than the “Obey” and “Hope” prints that made him famous belie. Days before his installation at the Halsey opens, Fairey stopped by the Charleston Music Hall for an on-stage chat with Halsey director Mark Sloan. The Music Hall was packed, and the attendees ranged from aging hippies to heavily tattooed college kids. Guests bopped along to the Gang of Four soundtrack, tittering in anticipation of a glance at America’s political silk-screen god. Finally, Fairey emerged, a 40-something ruffian in a jean jacket. The crowd erupted in applause; he really is an art rock star.

    FULL STORY »

    Shepard Fairey Returns to South Carolina Hometown for City-Wide Art Show | Fri. May. 30, 2014

    The Hollywood Reporter

    Charleston, South Carolina, is no stranger to conflict. It was the site of the first battle of the Civil War, and it’s also the hometown of one of the most outspoken human rights advocate artists of our times. The Holy City – named for its prevalence of churches – welcomed back one of its own this past week, as the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art at the College of Charleston opened an exhibition of Shepard Fairey‘s work, along with four public murals around the city and a series of conversations with the artist. Oh, and parties.

     

    FULL STORY >>

     

    FULL STORY »

    Shepard Fairey opens up about commercial success, its relation to his artwork | Tue. May. 27, 2014

    Post & Courier

    Often called one of his generation’s most influential street artists, Shepard Fairey is known for his works that often challenge the American dream, capitalism and greed.

    Those themes are obvious, if not explicit in Fairey’s new collection of works, “Power & Glory,” which was unveiled Thursday at the Halsey Gallery of Contemporary Art at the College of Charleston.

    Images of smoking factories, guns and oil spills are seen throughout the collection, painting a single portrait of a consumerist culture gone awry.

    Perhaps equally intriguing, however, is the fact that the Charleston native has proven over the course of his career that an artist can be a mouthpiece for anti-commercialism and at the same time a markedly successful entrepreneur.

    In addition to installing murals and creating works of fine art, Fairey heads a globally distributed clothing label and a graphic design business sought out by famous musicians and companies.

    FULL STORY »

    The Insistent Artists: A Halsey Homecoming | Mon. May. 26, 2014

    Charleston Magazine

    “I wasn’t allowed to go to King Street north of Calhoun by myself when I was growing up. It was a scary wasteland up there,” recalls Shepard Fairey, who will be creating an art installation in a King Street storefront as part of the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art’s May exhibition showcasing his work.

    Clearly, a lot has changed since the mid-1980s when Fairey was a teenage skate punk posting his now iconic “Obey Giant” stickers around Charleston and beyond. Those changes run much deeper than the refreshed building facades and influx of retail and foodie havens that have overtaken King Street, and perhaps no one recognizes this more acutely than a homegrown artist like Fairey, who says he fled the “duck print-dominated, watercolored, watered-down” artistic milieu of his youth to pursue gritty, provocative street art way out of town. He eventually landed in Los Angeles and then in the national spotlight when his Obama “HOPE” poster went viral in 2008. Over the last two-plus decades, Fairey has matured from guerilla street artist to commercial success, and likewise Charleston’s cultural and artistic DNA has also evolved. There’s an undercurrent that eagerly peers beyond the provincial; nostalgia is making way for new ideas.

    FULL STORY »

    FIRST LOOK | SHEPARD FAIREY’S “THE INSISTENT IMAGE” WITH JASPER JOHNS AT THE HALSEY INSTITUTE OF CONTEMPORARY ART | Sun. May. 25, 2014

    www.supertouchart.com

    South Carolina native Shepard Fairey proved once and for all to his hometown that crime pays when he commandeered Charleston’s Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art last week for the opening of his academically titled exhibition, The Insistent Image: Recurrent Motifs in the Art of Shepard Fairey and Jasper Johns. Of course, the most eye-catching detail in that title is the name of art legend “Jasper Johns,” alongside whom Fairey is showing, but not as a collaboration. Explains show curator Mark Sloan, “I’m not making any attempt to compare their works at all. I’m just using the same curatorial premise for two different artists.”

    FULL STORY »

    Street art pops up on King Street as Shepard Fairey prepares to open a new exhibit | Fri. May. 23, 2014

    Post & Courier

     

    Two large unsigned murals featuring a Boy Scout saluting an American flag with a dollar sign in place of stars have appeared on at least two unused buildings on King Street since Sunday. By noon Tuesday, one had been removed by Charleston code enforcement.

    The provocative murals are nearly identical to an illustration featured in guerrilla street artist Shepard Fairey’s storefront installation at the Sottile Theatre on King Street. An exhibit of Fairey’s work will open Thursday at the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art at the College of Charleston, and he has been creating public art on downtown buildings for more than a week.

    FULL STORY »

    Shepard Fairey-mania Hits Charleston | Thu. May. 22, 2014

    Holy City Sinner

    Shepard Fairey-mania has taken over the Holy City ahead of the Spoleto Festival. The artist has been leaving his mark around Charleston as part of the Halsey Institute’s 30th anniversary.

    Fairey is a Charleston native whose parents still live and work in the area. He is best known for his “André the Giant Has a Posse” (later “Obey Giant“) street art and the 2008 Barack Obama “Hope” campaign poster.

    FULL STORY »

    Shepard Fairey’s busy weekend in Charleston as seen via social media | Wed. May. 21, 2014

    Charleston City Paper

    We’ve already taken a look at Shepard Fairey’s first and second murals that popped up around town last week, but they Obey team was busy over the weekend too, knocking out three more pieces ahead of this week’s Piccolo Spoleto opening of The Insistent Image, featuring works by S.C.-natives Fairey and Jasper Johns at the Halsey Institute.

    The third mural is found high atop the Francis Marion Hotel, where Fairey’s OBEY GIANT mascot icon looms over Marion Square Park—maybe the only brow larger more furrowed than its neighbor, Vice President Calhoun.

    FULL STORY »

    Shepard Fairey Goes Home Again; Makes First Neon | Tue. May. 20, 2014

    ARTnews

    This week, Shepard Fairey will convert the derelict Sottile Theatre in Charleston, South Carolina, into a theater of his own, filling the space with piles of bricks, broken light fixtures, dilapidated filing cabinets, and other “detritus leftover from the American dream,” as Mark Sloan, director of the College of Charleston’s Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art, calls it.

    FULL STORY »

    Creating context from the familiar: The art of Jasper Johns evokes discomfort in viewers | Mon. May. 19, 2014

    Post & Courier

    Jasper Johns was born in Augusta, Ga., and grew up in Allendale, Columbia and Sumter, S.C. He is among the most important and influential living artists of the 20th and 21st century. Fifteen of his large-format prints (lithographs and intaglios) will be shown at the Halsey.

    Johns, now 84, uses repeated images and patterns: flags, targets, numbers, optical illusions such as the vase/face or the rabbit/duck, harlequins and galaxies. The effect is enigmatic, much more open to interpretation than Shepard Fairey’s work, but still a sort of commentary on the way we live and observe the world.

    FULL STORY »

    Seeing anew: Shepard Fairey wants daring, illicit nature of street art to be shared by viewers | Mon. May. 19, 2014

    Post & Courier

    Shepard Fairey was born in Charleston, attended Porter-Gaud School and went on to develop an immediately recognizable street-art style derivative of Soviet propaganda and commercial imagery, especially advertising. He became internationally known because of his Barack Obama “Hope” poster and the copyright controversy that thrust Fairey into the headlines.

    He likes to recycle certain motifs and draw from popular culture, employing the aesthetic of graphic design. Fairey inserts in his work familiar visual elements such as allegorical figures, oil wells, paint cans and signage, but he often presents them in a disturbing context that forces the viewer to confront a challenging social or political issue.

    FULL STORY »

    Shepard Fairey Paints It Black | Fri. Apr. 18, 2014

    Interview Magazine

    On May 22, on the other side of the country, “The Insistent Image: Recurrent Motifs in the Art of Shepard Fairey and Jasper Johns” will open at the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art in Charleston, South Carolina, Fairey’s hometown. Though born in Georgia, Jasper Johns, who is perhaps our most celebrated living American artist, spent much of his youth in South Carolina, where he developed a longtime friendship with William Halsey, for whom the institute was named. Each artist will occupy separate gallery spaces, as much care has been taken to ensure that direct comparisons are not made or at least influenced by the hand of the show’s curators. That being said, the work in Fairey’s exhibit, a multimedia collection of sculptures, paintings, screen prints, and more, collectively titled “Power & Glory,” analyzes everything that’s good and bad within the American way of life, with emphasis on our perverse fascination with power and the means through which we attain it.

    FULL STORY »

    Power & Glory: Shepard Fairey for Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art | Tue. Mar. 11, 2014

    freeyork.org

    Shepard Fairey is currently in his studio preparing for his upcoming exhibition The Insistent Image: Recurrent Motifs in the Art of Shepard Fairey and Jasper Johns opening at the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art on May 22.

    FULL STORY »

    Pop Art and Progress | Shepard Fairey in the Lowcountry | Mon. Mar. 10, 2014

    Mount Pleasant Magazine

    A progressive art movement is gaining traction here in the Lowcountry, around the country and even hundreds of miles about the Eart aboard the International Space Station. Elizabeth Willingham, a senior Studio Arts major at the College of Charleston and an intern at the school’s Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art, said she has noticed that the appeal of politically and socially charged art “with a message” is on the rise.

    FULL STORY »

    Jasper Johns’ Upcoming MoMA Show Incorporates the “Regrets” Stamp He Used to Decline Invites | Mon. Mar. 10, 2014

    Complex.com

    One of New York’s most reclusive artists, Jasper Johns was something of an enigma back in the day. Turns out, Johns had an efficient way of turning down all the invitations that flooded his mailbox on a daily basis; he would respond to requests using a rubber stamp that reads “Regrets” with his signature below. This very stamp makes a comeback in the Flags painter’s latest series of work to be unveiled at the Museum of Modern Art this Saturday, but that’s not the only recurring motif in his Regrets series.

    FULL STORY »

    Bodies at Play, Bodies at Work: Bob Trotman and Jody Zellen | Tue. Mar. 4, 2014

    Burnaway.org

    The basic challenge of life is dealing with the fact that we have—or are—bodies. Art meets this challenge in two ways. One is through representation, in which bodies can be freely idealized, abstracted, or fractured. Another is by eliciting bodily changes, such as laughs, winces, gasps, and other responses that go with our emotions. Artworks show us bodies and act through them. The two quite different exhibitions currently on view at the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art in Charleston are linked by their use of both of these strategies.

    FULL STORY »

    Details of the Halsey’s 30th anniversary show emerge | Fri. Feb. 21, 2014

    Charleston City Paper

    The Halsey is celebrating its 30th anniversary this year, and they’re doing it up big with a summer exhibition of works by American art heavyweights Shepard Fairey and Jasper Johns. When they announced the show last fall, we wondered how director Sloan was going to connect the two artists — Fairey began his career as a street artist and now works in the gray areas between fine, commercial, and street art, while Johns began his career as an abstract expressionist and developed a new style that rests on the idea of representing the familiar in new, unfamiliar ways.

    FULL STORY »

    WonderRoot Podcast: Renée Stout, the Conjure Woman | Fri. Feb. 21, 2014

    Burnaway.org

    Artist Renée Stout chats with Floyd Hall in this WonderRoot podcast, produced in conjunction with the Spelman College Museum of Fine Art. They discuss her use of alter egos in the creation of her work, the foundations of Hoodoo and conjuring, and how her work connects to and confronts established beliefs in the African American community.

    Stout’s exhibition, “Tales of the Conjure Woman,” is on view at the Spelman museum through May 17.

    FULL STORY »

    Review: Renée Stout casts a spell, recasts tradition | Wed. Feb. 12, 2014

    Arts Atl

    Conjure: to manipulate supernatural forces, using charms, roots and inanimate and handmade articles.

    Artist Renée Stout illuminates that tradition and makes it her own in Tales of the Conjure Woman, a carnival of conjuration at Spelman College Museum of Fine Art through May 17.

    FULL STORY »

    Upcoming: Shepard Fairey @ Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art | Sat. Feb. 8, 2014

    Arrested Motion

    Coming up in May, Shepard Fairey will be opening a show in Charleston, South Carolina where he grew up along with the work of Jasper Johns at the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art. The exhibition will feature new work by Fairey and a survey of prints made between 1982 and 2012 by Johns, highlighting both their technique of recycling graphic elements in separate galleries.

    FULL STORY »

    Charleston Music Hall: Groundhog Day Concert | Fri. Feb. 7, 2014

    Resound Magazine

    To me, the words “benefit” at a “music hall” implies stiffness, fancy evening wear, and music that everyone expects to hear and has heard before. That’s not the kind of show the Charleston Music Hall puts on, though, and it wasn’t that kind of benefit.  The music played at the Groundhog Day Benefit concert was much like the city of Charleston itself—southern, surprising and unlike any other.

    FULL STORY »

    Review: Groundhog Day Benefit Concert- The Opposite of a Trainwreck | Sun. Feb. 2, 2014

    The Art Mag

    I was in awe again at the Charleston Music Hall Saturday night as Bill Carson led us into a wonderland of aural bliss.  He and a mind-boggling group of minstrels played hours of music that was carefully curated, composed, and polished to perfection, in honor of the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art‘s 30th anniversary.

    FULL STORY »

    Groundhog Day Benefit Concert | Sat. Feb. 1, 2014

    The Art Mag

    The Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art, in collaboration with the Charleston Music Hall, will present an intimate evening of music featuring Charleston’s finest locally and nationally recognized musical acts on Groundhog Day. Come celebrate Groundhog Day with Charleston’s very own Bill Carson, Ron Wiltrout, Rachel Kate, Cary Anne Hearst, Michael Trent, Michael Flynn, Joel Hamilton, Charlton Singleton, Nathan Koci, Lindsay Holler, Kevin Hamilton, Wilton Elder, John Cobb, Stephanie Underhill, and Clint Fore, collaborating together for a night of incredible music.

    FULL STORY »

    Groundhog Day Benefit Concert | Sat. Feb. 1, 2014

    Charleston Magazine

    Cary Ann Hearst and Michael Trent, Lindsay Holler, Stephanie Underhill, Joel Hamilton, Rachel Kate, and Michael Flynn: Did those names get your attention? Well you’ll get to see each and every one of them performing at this Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art fundraiser, backed by “house band” The Opposite of a Train (Bill Carson, Nathan Koci, and Ron Wiltrout) with special guests Kevin Hamilton, Charlton Singleton, Wilton Elder, Clint Fore, and John Cobb. 

    FULL STORY »

    Groundhog Day Halsey Benefit Concert | Sat. Feb. 1, 2014

    Charlie Magazine

    Your favorite holiday is here and there’s only one way to kick it (besides Bill Murray movie marathons on TNT): a one-night concert with local musicians, including Cary Ann Hearst and Michael Trent.New

    FULL STORY »

    Jody Zellen: “Above the Fold” & Bob Trotman: “Business as Usual” | Fri. Jan. 31, 2014

    Charleston Magazine

    Two exhibits are opening at the Halsey, and they promise plenty of food for thought. Jody Zellen’s “Above the Fold” features works inspired by world news photos from The New York Times, including gouache on paper paintings, digital images, and an installation in which viewers trigger the sequencing of animations and sounds. Meanwhile, “Business as Usual” displays Bob Trotman’s mostly wood installations that he says “suggest an absurdist office-like arena in which we can see…the elaborate posturings of power, privilege, and pretense that…shape the world we live in.”

    FULL STORY »

    Weekend Round-Up: Cloudy With a Chance of Groundhog | Fri. Jan. 31, 2014

    Charleston City Paper

    Friday Jody Zellen and Bob Trotman’s exhibits open at the Halsey tonight. Our arts writer Leah Rhyne described Zellen’s work as a Google doodle in real life. That sounds pretty cool.

    FULL STORY »

    The Halsey Institute opens two exhibitions | Thu. Jan. 30, 2014

    The Times and Democrat

    The Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art at the College of Charleston School of the Arts kicks off 2014 with exhibitions featuring two artists, Bob Trotman and Jody Zellen. The exhibitions will be on view at the Halsey Institute from Jan. 31 through March 8. Admission is free. There will be an opening reception from 6:30 to 8 p.m. Friday, Jan. 31.

    FULL STORY »

    Groundhog Day Concert: Local musical standouts join together to celebrate 30 years of the Halsey | Wed. Jan. 29, 2014

    Charleston Scene

    Ask many of the artists involved in Saturday’s Groundhog Day Concert at the Charleston Music Hall what day in their musical history they’d most like to relive ad infinitum, and they often hark back to the first time they came together for the same purpose, back in 2010.

    For the 15 musicians involved, the opportunity to share a stage doesn’t come often, and requires a magnetic personality like Mark Sloan, director of the College of Charleston’s Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art, to pull them together.

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    African Spiritual Beliefs, Role-Play, and Self-Discovery Inspire Exhibition at Spelman College | Mon. Jan. 20, 2014

    Marketwired

    The African-derived folk beliefs of hoodoo and conjuring are summoned in the new exhibition “Renée Stout: Tales of the Conjure Woman” at the Spelman College Museum of Fine Art. Featuring Stout’s multimedia works, the exhibition, on view Jan. 30 through May 17, 2014, brings together painting, sculpture, printmaking, photography, glassblowing, installation, and compelling storytelling.

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    Halsey throws a Groundhog Day concert/party | Mon. Jan. 13, 2014

    Charleston City Paper

    It’s a big year for the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art, and they’re kicking it off with a big 30th anniversary party on Groundhog Day (that’s Sat. Feb. 1, in case you were wondering). To raise money and celebrate the Halsey’s place in the local art culture, Charleston’s finest musicians will take the stage for an evening concert at the Charleston Music Hall. 

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