PAST PRESS

  • 2017 (14)
  • 2016 (22)
  • 2015 (48)
  • 2014 (50)
  • 2013 (32)
  • 2012 (32)
  • 2011 (25)
  • 2010 (18)
  • 2009 (25)
  • 2008 (13)


  • RECENT PRESS COVERAGE

    Book of Hours: An Evening of Poetry and Conjure by Kevin Young | Sat. Nov. 16, 2013

    Charleston City Paper

    It’s impressive enough that poet Kevin Young is a National Book Award finalist, but that’s only the tip of the iceberg. This Harvard graduate and Emory poetry professor has also been awarded a Stegner Fellowship, a Guggenheim Fellowship, and an NEA Fellowship, and he’s also been recognized with awards for several poetry collections. Now he’s been commissioned to write the principal essay in the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art’s catalogue for their upcoming exhibition Renée Stout: Tales of the Conjure Woman.

    FULL STORY »

    Hoodoo Moon: Ninth Annual Membership Celebration | Fri. Nov. 8, 2013

    Charleston City Paper

    They’ll put a spell on you. And by they we mean the art at the Halsey. To gain entry to the party you have to be a member of the Halsey, but membership isn’t too hefty a price — and it can get you some perks, like special members-only parties or behind-the-scene tours.

    FULL STORY »

    Tales of the Conjure Woman | Fri. Nov. 1, 2013

    Charlie

    We’re told Reneé Stout’s show at the Halsey Institute wasn’t timed to run over Halloween.

    Really?

    The roots, herbs, talk of dragon’s blood, and potions of perfumes are certainly reminiscent of the holiday. Also, a succubus, the crying mirror, and a voodoo vending machine are great costume ideas.

    FULL STORY »

    Don ZanFagna, visionary and eco-artist, dies | Tue. Oct. 29, 2013

    Charleston City Paper

    ZanFagna left a legacy of self-sustaining homes and extreme eco-architecture

    Don ZanFagna, the man behind the ultra-eco-houses, or Pulse Domes, that filled the Halsey Institute last September, passed away last week at the age of 84, according to the Post and Courier

    ZanFagna was an artist and teacher who became obsessed with the idea for a Pulse Dome, a self-sustaining structure that was more akin to animal architecture — warrens, beaver mounds, etc. — than human. Built with organic materials, the Pulse Domes were intended to be sustainable in the most extreme sense. They would produce their own energy, grow crops, and be in perfect harmony with its environment.

    FULL STORY »

    Birth of the Living Dead | Thu. Oct. 17, 2013

    Charleston City Paper

    It doesn’t matter if you’ve got zombie fever or are on the verge of punching the next person who starts talking about The Walking Dead in the face, you have to recognize that zombies have changed horror forever. On Thursday, the Halsey Institute screens Birth of the Living Dead, a documentary about the iconic horror movie Night of the Living Dead. “This documentary falls in line with one of the Halsey Institute’s tenants — demystifying the creative process,” says Lizz Biswell, the curator of education and public programs at the Halsey. 

    FULL STORY »

    Renée Stout conjures up the imaginary world of Fatima Mayfield | Thu. Oct. 17, 2013

    Charleston City Paper

    When you go to a Renée Stout exhibit, be prepared to encounter two people. First there’s Stout, the artist. Then there’s Fatima Mayfield, Stout’s hoodoo-practicing healer alter-ego and the subject of an upcoming exhibit at the Halsey Institute, Tales of the Conjure Woman. Looking at the work that makes up Tales of the Conjure Woman, you’ll see Mayfield’s handwritten notes on seduction, her collection of roots and herbs in bottles and jars, models of hearts in torso-shaped wire cages, and paintings of various characters who people Mayfield’s world. The experience is one of looking through somebody’s else’s things — always a guilty pleasure — with an added spookiness that comes not only from the mystical nature of those mysterious objects, but from the ghostly presence of Mayfield herself.

    FULL STORY »

    Shared Space | Mon. Oct. 14, 2013

    College of Charleston Magazine

    According to Frank Lloyd Wright, “Space is the breath of art”: The areas around, between and within art can be just as meaningful as the piece itself- and, as Herb Parker and Joseph Burwell ’93 (pictured above) demonstrated in their conjoined exhibits at the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art this fall, so can the areas around, between and within the artist’s workspace.

    FULL STORY »

    Renee Stout at the Halsey Institute: Conjuring a ‘shadow world’ | Sun. Oct. 13, 2013

    Charleston Post & Courier

    The vital and transformative nature of art is a reminder of the power we wield as human beings susceptible to the creative process: our ability to express and discern meaning.

    Renee Stout is an artist who makes objects that are themselves transformations. Her mixed-media work reflects her long search for manifestations of West African culture in the landscape of the United States, and represents both an inward and outward exploration of identity and language.

    FULL STORY »

    Making Conversation | Wed. Sep. 25, 2013

    Charleston Magazine

    Herb Parker’s organic structures have sprouted up all over the world, from beneath a waterfall in Japan to, most recently, Artpark on the Niagara River in New York.  Composed of natural materials like bamboo, clay, and moss, the structures aren’t really built to last, yet they leave a lasting impression on viewers, who often walk away with an altered perception of the environment- at least that’s Parker’s goal.

    FULL STORY »

    Hoodoo Moon Bash | Fri. Sep. 20, 2013

    Charleston Art Mag

    The Halsey Institute of Contemporary art will host their 9th annual “moon themed” membership celebration with their Hoodoo Moon Bash. This will include Hoodoo readings and consultations by Dr. O, and Cajun-style festivities with music by Minimum Wage. 

    FULL STORY »

    Renée Stout – Halsey Institute for Contemporary Art | Fri. Sep. 20, 2013

    The Art Mag

    Are you in need of a good luck charm, in search of spiritual guidance, or help with your relationship? Conjure woman, spiritualist, seer, herbalist, and fortune teller, Fatima Mayfield is here for you. She’s the alter- ego of Washington D.C.-based artist, Renée Stout, who returns, after a 17-year hiatus, to the College of Charleston’s Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art with Tales of a Conjure Woman, featuring an array of work from the fictional Fatima’s life and conjuring practice.

    FULL STORY »

    Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art Features Works by Joseph Burwell and Herb Parker | Sun. Sep. 1, 2013

    Carolina Arts

    The Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art at the College of Charleston School of the Arts in Charleston, SC, kicked off its fall season with exhibitions featuring two internationally recognized artists; Joseph Burwell and Herb Parker. Entitled Joseph Burwell: School of the Viking Spaniard Revisited and Herb Parker: Studio Practice the exhibitions examine the relationship between the studio and the work produced within. College of Charleston sculpture professor Herb Parker and alum Joseph Burwell will recreate their studio spaces within the Halsey Institute’s galleries.

    FULL STORY »

    Joseph Burwell: School of the Viking Spaniard Revisited and Herb Parker: Studio Practice | Mon. Aug. 26, 2013

    Post and Courier

    The stereotypical image of the artist’s studio as a paint-splattered, sparsely furnished garret where the lone artist toils away, producing their brilliant works is in much need of re-examination. Many artists’ studios are a far cry from this description, and serve very different functions for their inhabitants. This exhibition will examine the relationship between the studio and the work produced within it by two contemporary artists who will recreate their studio spaces within the galleries.

     

    FULL STORY »

    “Studio Practice” & “School of the Viking Spaniard Revisited” | Fri. Aug. 23, 2013

    Charleston City Paper

    If the image of a paint-splattered and sparsely furnished loft comes to mind when you think of an artist‘s studio, then it’s time to visit the Halsey. For this exhibit, two artists recreated their work spaces in the gallery, allowing us to examine their creative processes.

    FULL STORY »

    School of the Viking Spaniard Revisited | Fri. Aug. 23, 2013

    Charleston City Paper

    Joseph Burwell’s studio showcases his drawings on wood, which are blueprints for modular structures inspired by ancient sacrificial sites, modernist habitats, and medieval fortifications. His studio also contains elements referencing the structures found in his intricate works.

    FULL STORY »

    Studio Practice | Fri. Aug. 23, 2013

    Charleston City Paper

    Herb Parker lets viewers into the inside workings of his studio space that utilizes found objects and act as a point of departure from his large-scale, site-specific nature-based installations.

    FULL STORY »

    The Halsey Institute Presents: Studio Practice: Herb Parker and Joseph Burwell | Sat. Aug. 17, 2013

    The Art Mag

    Director and Senior Curator of the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art Mark Sloan was kind enough to provide us with a quick overview of the exhibition Studio Practice.  Entering an artist’s studio is a very special thing, as you are being allowed into a very unique space, often containing their most private thoughts, inspirations, ideas, and creations.

    FULL STORY »

    Studios exhibit offers glimpse inside artists’ minds | Sun. Aug. 11, 2013

    Charleston Post & Courier

    Have you ever had the opportunity to wander around in an artist’s studio?

    It’s like being inside their brain. I’ve long been fascinated with the bits and pieces that inspire artists and would love to have private time to look into the studios of some of the famous ones.

    Like Picasso, for instance. He had various studios over the years, and in pictures it’s wonderful to see the high ceilings and historic architectural rooms flooded with light, his paintings leaning against walls and his pottery stacked around the room.

    FULL STORY »

    THE HALSEY INSTITUTE OF CONTEMPORARY ART RECIEVES MAJOR AWARDS FOR 2012 EXHIBITION CATALOGUES | Sun. Jul. 7, 2013

    The Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art at the College of Charleston School of the Arts recently received four major awards for publications they produced in conjunction with two 2012 exhibitions.

    1. The Aggie Zed: Keeper’s Keep exhibition catalogue won the American Alliance of Museums’ 1st Prize in Exhibition Catalogues produced by museums with an annual budget of less than $750,000.
    2. The Keeper’s Keep catalogue was one of the 50 books selected as a winner in Design Observer’s 50 Books/50 Covers competition.
    3. The Return to the Sea: Saltworks by Motoi Yamamoto exhibition catalogue won the American Alliance of Museums’ 2nd Prize in Books produced by museums with an annual budget of less than $750,000.
    4. The Return to the Sea exhibition catalogue won Communication Arts’ 2013 Design Annual in the category for Catalogues.

     

    FULL STORY »

    Rebound: Dissections and Excavations in Book Art | Tue. Jun. 18, 2013

    Colossal

    The Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art at the College of Charleston in South Carolina recently opened an immense exhibition featuring five contemporary artists who create sculptures and installations using various books and printed materials. Rebound features new works by Guy Laramee, Long Bin Chen, Francesca Pastine, Doug Beube, and Brian Dettmer. You can see many more exhibition views on the Hasley Institute’s website. The show runs through July 6, 2013.

    FULL STORY »

    Rebound: Dissections and Excavations in Book Art | Tue. Jun. 4, 2013

    Daily Serving

    There is no doubt that “the relevance of physical books in our culture is diminishing” according to curator Karen Ann Meyers. Rebound, presented by the College of Charleston‘s Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art, shows five artists who use books to create sculpture. Books provide a mass of free material for these artists. Encyclopedia sets were once functional objects from a different time and culture. These discarded books are given new life.

    FULL STORY »

    Rebound: Dissections and Excavations in Book Art | Tue. Jun. 4, 2013

    Juxtapoz

    The Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art at the College of Charleston School of the Arts recently organized a major group exhibition of new works by five mixed media artists from around the world who sculpt, scrape, bend and carve to create astonishing compositions using books. On view through July 6th, the exhibition features work from Doug Beube, Long-Bin Chen, Brian Dettmer, Guy Laramee, and Frecesca Pastine.

    FULL STORY »

    Literature in Great Shapes | Sat. Jun. 1, 2013

    The Wall Street Journal

    Who says print is dead? Guy Laramée was getting master’s degrees in sculpture and anthropology when, frustrated by the mounting pile of material he had to learn, he sandblasted a book, making it look like a mountain. Ever since that day in 1999, Mr. Laramée has turned blasting books into an art form – and commentary on the information age.

    FULL STORY »

    Books and art beyond the Halsey | Fri. May. 31, 2013

    Charleston City Paper

    Books and art are bedfellows in several art shows this year. The amazing Rebound: Dissections and Excavations in Book Art, can be seen at the Halsey Institute (see my posting about that from several days ago), but do not miss a portion of this exhibition at the College of Charleston Addlestone Library.

    Zen Garden by Long-Bin Chen fills the rotunda with large pieces, stepping stones, and a sea of paper confetti in the library rotunda. Like all the other works in Rebound, this one is made entirely of books that have been transformed, and this one was created specifically for the library space. Don’t miss it — and since it is in the library you can see it in the morning and well into the evening.

    FULL STORY »

    Adapting books | Wed. May. 29, 2013

    Charleston Post & Courier

    In a Brooklyn basement, blonde wood shelves stuffed with leather-bound tomes line the walls. Doug Beube, a mixed-media artist, has a home studio full of books, but his basement is not your typical library. In the center of the room lie Beube’s carpentry tools — a table saw, a dremel rotary tool, a belt sander. Beube motions to the books on the walls, “These,” he said, “are up next for the guillotine.”

    A paper guillotine — a large paper cutter with a long, knife-like handle at one end — is a normal tool for those working with paper. Beube would know. He apprenticed with a professional book binder while getting his masters in photography in Rochester, N.Y. It’s an appropriately dramatic object for transforming a book into a work of sculptural art.

    FULL STORY »

    Long-Bin Chen creates a Zen garden in the Addlestone’s rotunda | Wed. May. 22, 2013

    Charleston City Paper

    There are outdated encyclopedias, copies of The Hunger Games, paperbacks from the mid-century, and old issues of Charleston magazine covering every bit of table space in the College of Charleston’s sculpture studio. They’ve been sorted by size, color, and material, and while there are hundreds of books here, this isn’t even all of the ones that the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art now has in its possession. Over the last few months, the Halsey has collected tens of thousands of books from the Charleston community, turning them over to a somewhat violent fate at the hands of book artist Long-Bin Chen.

    FULL STORY »

    Rebound’s five artists give a second life to books | Wed. May. 22, 2013

    Charleston City Paper

    Karen Ann Myers is expecting people to freak out at her Halsey curatorial debut. She’s organized a show that challenges the most sacred possessions in human history, the Bibles and the Great Gatsbys and the Twilights of the world: books.

    Some books can be written off as carriers of information, while others are simply beach-read trash. But many are actually objects of desire and value — that’s why whenever Myers moves somewhere new, she packs and unpacks her two huge bookshelves, even if she has no problem throwing away plenty of other belongings.

    FULL STORY »

    Young Contemporaries highlights CofC’s star students | Fri. Apr. 5, 2013

    Charleston City Paper

    Walk into the this year’s Young Contemporaries exhibit at the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art and you’ll find plenty of faces looking back at you: a grinning man in front of rows of pocket knives, a pair of Baroque-era young ladies with tattoos and piercings, and a large, green tree with a pick comb sticking out of its branches. Each of these were created by College of Charleston students who made the cut for the annual juried student exhibition this year.

    FULL STORY »

    Poetic Visions: From Shimmer to Sister Gertrude Morgan | Wed. Jan. 30, 2013

    Aesthetica Magazine

    It can be said that art can serve as a universal language. Visual artist Lesley Dill applies literal meaning to art as a communicative agent by incorporating various forms of language into her multi-faceted work. Currently on view at the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art in Charleston, South Carolina, Poetic Visions: From Shimmer to Sister Gertrude Morgan reveals a fusion of the visual with the verbal through an amalgamation of  sculpture, fashion, installation, painting, and drawing.

    FULL STORY »

    Reading series to blend poetry, ‘Visions’ | Mon. Jan. 28, 2013

    Charleston Post & Courier

    It’s not often that an art installation so perfectly embraces the written word. But Lesley Dill’s “Poetic Visions: From Shimmer to Sister Gertrude Morgan” exhibit not only embraces language but demands the words come alive. To go with the exhibit, there is a “Tongues Aflame” poetry series designed to be a response to Dill’s fusion of language, costume and image.

    For four dates in February, poets will read some of their work standing in the midst of Dill’s creations. The readings are co-sponsored by the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art, the College of Charleston Department of English, Poetry Society of South Carolina and the literary magazine Crazyhorse.

    FULL STORY »

    Lesley Dill’s Poetic Visions | Mon. Jan. 28, 2013

    Charleston Post & Courier

    Sometimes visual art is simply meant to dazzle, shock or fascinate. Sometimes its aesthetic is superficial: it’s the surface of the work, what’s clearly visible, that communicates a fundamental idea of beauty or brutality or intricacy. Art for art’s sake.

    But sometimes, art is about ideas, and what’s visible is only the outward manifestation of something larger or more significant. This is art as symbol.

    FULL STORY »

    Lesley Dill’s Poetic Visions draws from poetry, revelation | Wed. Jan. 23, 2013

    Charleston City Paper

    I’ve been poring over the exhibit catalog for Lesley Dill’s Poetic Visions: From Shimmer to Sister Gertrude Morgan for days. The pages are filled with images of richly colored, dramatic mixed-media creations. A figure in a huge white wedding dress with a train that rises to meet the ceiling, its face shrouded in layers and layers of tulle. Colorful paper skeletons riding skeletal horses across a wall. Ambiguous, metallic human forms, some looking to the sky, some seeming to stare right back at the viewer. And most importantly, words. There are words everywhere, on the wedding dress, on the walls, in the skeletons’ hands.

    FULL STORY »

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