PAST PRESS

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  • 2008 (13)


  • RECENT PRESS COVERAGE

    Clemson Architecture Center’s Pulse Dome project hits a roadblock | Wed. Dec. 5, 2012

    Charleston City Paper

    Not to editorialize, but the Pulse Dome Project: Art and Design by Don ZanFagna exhibit at the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art is exceptional. If you haven’t seen it yet, do so before it closes on Dec. 8.

    However, despite the gallery’s vivid collages of the artist’s dream of self-sustaining houses, we were most excited about a different aspect of the exhibition: the Clemson Architecture Center in Charleston’s real-life pulse dome, which they were hoping to construct in Marion Square before the Thanksgiving break. As the City Paper detailed in its October cover story on ZanFagna, the Clemson students — led by professor and architect David Pastre — were hoping to build a bamboo dome and usable bridge over the park’s fountain. Unfortunately, things didn’t work out as planned.

    FULL STORY »

    Don ZanFagna, visionary artist, reimagines way we live; ‘Pulse Dome’ series on display at Halsey Institute | Mon. Oct. 22, 2012

    Charleston Post & Courier

    Don ZanFagna is an adventurer, a climber of the mind’s mountain peaks, a man who skydives through the imagination. He is the inventor of the “Dome of Ultimate Possibilities,” the “Echo-Locator of Splendor,” the “Pillar of Life Retro-Erecto.” He is more than an artist, said Mark Sloan, director of the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art. He’s a visionary whose work pushes boundaries and probes big questions. It’s not meant to serve as an explicit blueprint for a sane new world, Sloan said. It is ZanFagna’s way of channeling profound concerns.

    FULL STORY »

    Don ZanFagna wanted to grow houses: The Halsey and CAC are trying to make that happen | Wed. Oct. 17, 2012

    Charleston City Paper

    It’s late September in one of the white classrooms at the Clemson Architecture Center in Charleston’s Franklin Street building, and 10 students are trying to grow a house.

    As part of professor and architect David Pastre’s design-build studio class, the pupils have been split into three groups. Each has been tasked with creating a Pulse Dome, a self-sustaining structure originally devised in the 1960s and ’70s by current Mt. Pleasant resident Don ZanFagna. The construction is intended to be assembled in Marion Square, the city’s most public venue.

    FULL STORY »

    My Routine | Aggie Zed, artist | Wed. Oct. 10, 2012

    The Courier-Journal

    Artist Aggie Zed, whose paintings and sculptural work are on view at B. Deemer Gallery, grew up on Sullivan’s Island in South Carolina. Although she now lives in a rural area outside Charlottesville, Va., her work is inspired by her childhood, and earlier this year it was part of an extensive exhibit of her work at the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art in Charleston, S.C.

    FULL STORY »

    Htein Lin shares stories of activism and art at the Halsey | Wed. Oct. 3, 2012

    Charleston City Paper

    Htein Lin has six and a half years’ worth of art painted on white cotton prison uniforms. The paintings? His own. The uniforms? Also his own. Lin is a Burmese painter and performance artist who spent more than seven years as a political prisoner — seven months of that time on death row. And during all that time, he has never stopped creating art.

    FULL STORY »

    Review: ‘Paternal Suit’ at Halsey Institute combines history, theater, presenting Hess family narrative that might be true | Sun. Sep. 9, 2012

    Charleston Post & Courier

    Possibly it was his father, Eugene Nolan Jr., who punched the hole that artist F. Scott Hess would struggle to fill in myriad ways over time.

    Nolan disappeared from his son’s life, then was found decades later with an inadequate ancestral memory. Hess, obsessed with genealogy and history, was left unsatisfied. But a solution soon presented itself.

    He’s always been a storyteller of sorts, he said. Known primarily as a realist painter, his pictures include built-in narratives. He’s tried his hand at fiction writing, too. But Hess found his voice in 2005 when he established the F. Scott Hess Family Foundation and initiated his hunt for family artifacts in earnest.

    FULL STORY »

    Japanese artist Motoi Yamamoto gets creative with salt | Thu. Sep. 6, 2012

    The Daily Breeze

    Over the past two weeks, Motoi Yamamoto has turned 400 pounds of salt into an extraordinary art exhibit. What he creates with it are mazelike pictures on the floors of galleries all over the world. The Laband exhibit, “Return to the Sea: Saltworks by Motoi Yamamoto,” began at Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art in Charleston, S.C.

    “They organize really wonderful traveling shows and I was looking for a traveling show and this just jumped off the screen to me. I was just so touched seeing some of the images of his previous work and just so moved by kind of the obsessiveness, the monumental aspects of it,” says Carolyn Peter, director of the Laband Art Gallery.”

    FULL STORY »

    Motoi Yamamoto’s Saltworks | Thu. Aug. 30, 2012

    KCRW

    Japanese artist Motoi Yamamoto has created elaborate installations emulating ruins, corridors and labyrinths, all made entirely of white salt, in museums and galleries around the world but his first show in Los Angeles is now at the Laband Art Gallery at Loyola Marymount University.

    FULL STORY »

    Halsey offering free audio tours of exhibitions | Mon. Aug. 27, 2012

    Charleston City Paper

    The Halsey is now offering free smartphone-powered audio tours of their exhibitions. The gallery premiered the feature at this summer’s Return to the Sea exhibition, and it’s all set up for F. Scott Hess’ Paternal Suit exhibit, which opens Fri. Aug. 24. QR codes will be placed throughout the exhibition, offering more in-depth stories and anecdotes about various pieces.

    FULL STORY »

    Pulse Dome Project: Art and Design by Don ZanFagna | Thu. Aug. 23, 2012

    Charleston City Paper

    What if you could grow your own house? That mind-boggling idea was first explored by artist and architect Dan ZanFagna decades ago. Mark Sloan, executive director at the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art, says a persistent concern and idea of ZanFagna’s over the course of his long and very interesting career was that humankind is living in disharmony with the environment. “He wanted to create something that would allow us to sustain ourselves,” Sloan says. By studying patterns that develop in nature, ancient civilizations like the Mayans and the Egyptians, and even insects like bees, he came to develop the idea of a “pulse dome,” or a structure that was not just a shelter but a source of energy for the people living inside of it. Think about that concept for a second. What if, instead of greening our buildings and maximizing energy savings, we came up with a whole new approach to building that turned our homes into living, sustainable organisms?

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    F. Scott Hess pranks the past with The Paternal Suit | Thu. Aug. 23, 2012

    Charleston City Paper

    As author Stephanie Yuhl observed in her book A Golden Haze of Memory: The Making of Historic Charleston, the foundation of Charleston’s modern tourism economy rests on residents’ fantasies of an idyllic antebellum past. It’s an interesting topic, but it doesn’t make Charleston, or the universal human impulse to “improve” one’s ancestors, unique.

    It does, however, frame the premier of F. Scott Hess’ exhibit The Paternal Suit: Heirlooms From the F. Scott Hess Family Foundation as one of the most provocative events to hit the city this century. The exhibit opens at the Halsey Institute on Aug. 24, and what happens after that is anyone’s guess.

    FULL STORY »

    Nine Things We Love About Charleston, SC | Wed. Jul. 18, 2012

    Huffinton Post

    Few places outshine South Carolina’s romantic low country when it comes to a memorable summer getaway. Although we wish that airfares were sometimes lower, they’ll come down again once the kids are back in school (around August 17 or so). Charleston, the region’s star city and one of the South’s most appealing destinations, has more things to do than can comfortably be listed in a short round-up, but here are nine of my favorites. Charleston is known for its historic charm, but it also boasts a vibrant contemporary arts scene well worth exploring. Start with a visit to the College of Charleston’s Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art, located in an attractive new space on Calhoun Street.

    FULL STORY »

    The Frindge: Salt Returns to the Sea in Motoi Yamamoto’s Installations | Tue. Jul. 10, 2012

    BURNAWAY

    Yamamoto’s large-scale, intricate, temporary sculptures and installations created out of salt are the artist’s way of memorializing his sister, who died at the age of 24 of brain cancer. Yamamoto—who had long used natural materials in his work such as grass, wood and water—chose salt because of its simplicity and purity. Salt is broadly symbolic in Japanese culture—used in funeral ceremonies, placed outside of temples, tossed into the ring before sumo matches, set in a pile at the door of a restaurant as a sign of welcome—a powerful symbol of cleanliness and purity, primarily deriving from salt’s preservative qualities and its historical scarcity in Japan.

    FULL STORY »

    Halsey bids farewell to exhibit with salt-scraping extravaganza | Mon. Jul. 9, 2012

    Charleston City Paper

    Guests crowded into the Halsey lobby Saturday afternoon to take part in the closing celebration of Motoi Yamamoto’s Saltworks exhibition. The Halsey attracted a record 8,000 visitors over six weeks who came to see the site-specific installation made entirely of salt. According to curator Mark Sloan, the salt was only disturbed twice — by a fallen pair of sunglasses and an iPhone. Both were retrieved with a wooden stick with double-sided tape on the end.

    FULL STORY »

    Ceremonial Dismantling | Sun. Jul. 1, 2012

    Charleston Post & Courier

    Hundreds of people help dismantle Return to the Sea: Saltworks by Motoi Yamamoto in the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art at the College of Charleston School of the Arts.

    FULL STORY »

    An interview with Motoi Yamamoto | Thu. Jun. 14, 2012

    Daily Serving

    For over a decade now, Japanese artist Motoi Yamamoto has been engaging with his memories through the physical act of creation. Building large scale installations by hand and out of salt, Motoi brings form to the immaterial, actively wrestling with memories that are in a constant state of flux. Just as memories are unfixed and transient, Motoi’s installations are equally unstable and temporary. Motoi transforms salt into intricate and laborious installations, which are eventually swept up and returned to the sea. DailyServing’s founder, Seth Curcio, had the opportunity to speak with Motoi about the cultural implications of salt, the immaterial qualities of death, and the forms best suited to articulate loss.

    FULL STORY »

    Artist Spotlight: Motoi Yamamoto | Wed. May. 30, 2012

    Garden & Gun

    If you’re headed to Charleston this summer, make plans to fit in a visit to the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art between beach trips. The gallery’s newest exhibition, Return to the Sea: Saltworks by Motoi Yamamoto just opened (May 24 – July 7) and is well-worth a visit.

    FULL STORY »

    Yamamoto’s Halsey exhibit ponders impermanence | Mon. May. 28, 2012

    Charleston City Paper

    If a tree falls in the forest and no one is around to hear it, does it make a sound? That old question implies that one wouldn’t occur without the other, and grants the listener a role of importance in the process. Ephemeral art is defined as “lasting only a short time,” and like that proverbial tree, depends on the viewer to be seen. A well-known example of ephemeral art is the Tibetan sand mandalas. In Saltworks: Return to the Sea, Motoi Yamamoto doesn’t mind the impermanence of his work and says it’s the process that matters.

    FULL STORY »

    The Halsey shows Saltworks by installation artist Motoi Yamamoto | Sun. May. 27, 2012

    Charleston Post & Courier

    Motoi Yamamoto shifts his weight on the mat he is kneeling on, sitting up from his work and surveying the mammoth design on the floor of the gallery. The 46-year-old Japanese artist wears all black, wire-rimmed glasses and socks with five toes. He blows out a breath and hunches over his work, tilting a bicycle squeeze bottle to draw a curlicue pattern on the floor with a trickle of table salt, like a baker adding piping to the rim of a cake.

    FULL STORY »

    Motoi Yamamoto grieves with an elaborate salt installation | Fri. May. 25, 2012

    Charleston City Paper

    When someone dies, those left behind are said to go through five stages of grief: denial, anger, bargaining, depression, and acceptance. In her 1969 book On Death and Dying, Elisabeth Kubler-Ross wrote that these stages are not chronological, and that people coping with loss can cycle through various stages or get stuck in one stage or another. But what happens when a death is unexpected or comes too soon? Do those left behind ever reach the final stage, or does the grief stay with us forever?

    FULL STORY »

    Stop in to these Festival eve art openings | Fri. May. 25, 2012

    Charleston City Paper

    The Halsey is hosting Return to the Sea: Saltworks by Motoi Yamamoto, a site-specific installation created by the Japanese artist. Working for the past two weeks, Yamamoto has tangled the Halsey floor into a complex maze of salt. The reception will be held from 5-7 p.m. and is rumored to be Japanese-themed with Japanese food and beverages.

    FULL STORY »

    Children’s Museum Summer Campers to visit Saltworks Installation at Halsey Institute | Thu. May. 24, 2012

    Lowcountry Biz

    “We are so excited to learn about Japanese culture and watch Motoi in action! Not many children have the opportunity to watch an artist work. Most see the finished product and that is why this field trip is so important to us because we’re focusing on the process over the product. This is a fabulous experience that we are very proud to provide to our campers this year and hope to continue this and other partnerships in the future,” said Robin Berlinsky, Director of Education at the Children’s Museum of the Lowcountry and adjunct professor at the College of Charleston.

    FULL STORY »

    Return to the Sea: Saltworks by Motoi Yamamoto | Tue. May. 22, 2012

    Consulate-General of Japan in Atlanta

    Radiating an intense beauty and tranquility, Motoi Yamamoto’s Return to the Sea conveys something both ineffable and endless. The centerpiece of the exhibition is a site-specific installation created solely from salt during the artist’s three-week residency at the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art at the Marion and Wayland H. Cato Jr. Center for the Arts at College of Charleston. Motoi forged a connection to salt—a symbol of purity in Japanese culture—in an effort to preserve memories of his sister, who died at the age of 24. The exhibition also features a series of Motoi’s recent drawings, paintings, and sketchbooks. The Consulate-General of Japan highly recommends that those able to see the installation take advantage of this opportunity.

    FULL STORY »

    Motoi Yamamoto finishing up Saltworks installation | Tue. May. 22, 2012

    Charleston City Paper

    We stopped by the Halsey Institute this morning to see artist Motoi Yamamoto putting the finishing touches on his site-specific installation made entirely of salt. He’s spent the last two weeks using the main gallery floor as his canvas to create an intricate labyrinth. Guests are invited to walk around but not within the installation, and platforms have been built to allow for a bird’s eye view.

    FULL STORY »

    Behind-the-Scenes Pass | Tue. May. 22, 2012

    Charleston Magazine

    It’s just one week until Spoleto’s onslaught of performances, exhibits, and parties descends upon the Holy City. And though you won’t necessarily see it, many hands—those of dancers and directors, costume designers and event planners—are beside-themselves-busy with behind-the-scenes prepping for the 17-day artistic whirlwind. However, there is an opportunity to witness the amazing preparation and creation in progress at the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art. Japanese artist Motoi Yamamoto arrived in Charleston a few days ago and on Monday began transforming the 2,300-square-foot gallery floor into a mesmerizing tableau of salt, a symbol of purification in his culture.

    FULL STORY »

    Charleston’s Spoleto Festival celebrates birthday of composer Philip Glass | Mon. May. 21, 2012

    The Augusta Chronicle

    The visual arts offering is the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art’s show by Motoi Yamamoto, who uses salt to create large-scale art installations that resemble — depending on how you view it — lace, waves or mazes.

    The Charleston installation won’t be completed until the night before the festival opens, because Yamamoto works painstakingly sitting on the floor to create patterns for the installation. But Yamamoto sees his work as a form of meditation.

    FULL STORY »

    Halsey Institute Receives Statewide Award | Fri. Apr. 27, 2012

    College of Charleston News

    Palmetto Portraits Project, a partnership between the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art in the School of the Arts at the College of Charleston and the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC), is the winner of one of 10 Notable State Document Awards for 2011. The awards are presented to South Carolina agencies in order to focus on the important value of information compiled and produced by governmental agencies and to emphasize the importance of open and equal public access to this information.

    FULL STORY »

    Emily Rosko draws poetic inspiration from the Bard | Wed. Feb. 22, 2012

    Charleston City Paper

    Emily Rosko is already looking ahead to her next project, a book tentatively titled Weather Inventions that she says explores the emergence of the scientific revolution in the 17th century. She’s also planning to write a series of poems inspired by S.C. native Aggie Zed, whose work graces the cover of Prop Rockery. “If anything she has been my great inspiration and discovery since being in Charleston,” Rosko says. Zed’s sculptures are currently on view at the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art.”

    FULL STORY »

    Halsey Institute, Sloan honored with Verner Award | Sun. Feb. 19, 2012

    Charleston Post and Courier

    In South Carolina, there is no greater award in the arts than the Elizabeth O’Neill Verner Governor’s Award, and the list of this year’s winners is out. The Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art won one for arts organization, with a special nod to director Mark Sloan.

    Mark Sloan has been one of the driving forces behind the success of the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art and received a special mention in this year’s Elizabeth O’Neill Verner Awards for arts organizations.

    Sloan has made the Halsey a place to see provocative work, both from South Carolina and from any place that piques his interest. His choices show work that really has few other venues, and Sloan is now curating traveling shows.

    FULL STORY »

    Aggie Zed Speaks on Sullivan’s | Wed. Feb. 1, 2012

    The Island Eye News

    Aggie Zed, whose work is currently on display at the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art in Charleston, grew up here on Sullivan’s Island. The show, comprised of sculpture, paintings, drawings, sketchbooks and installations, had never before been seen before the much-anticipated opening, held on Friday, January 20.

    The opening was attended by a crush of 800 people. The lecture, held the following day, was equally crowded. Originally planned as a gallery walk-through, it was necessary for attendees to line walls and sit on the floor, in order to have their burning questions answered by Aggie Zed herself. Fittingly, the first inquiry of evening regarded Aggie’s childhood on Sullivan’s Island and how that unique experience has come to influence her work.

    FULL STORY »

    Aggie Zed lets your imagination run wild | Thu. Jan. 19, 2012

    Charleston City Paper

    Imagine you’re reading a story filled with quiet women surrounded by animals, little men with human bodies and elephant heads, and copper-and-ceramic horses that look a little steampunk, a little classical.

    That, in a sense, is what looking at the work of Virginia-based painter and sculptor Aggie Zed is like.

    FULL STORY »

    From the mind of an artist | Sun. Jan. 15, 2012

    Charleston Post and Courier

    Aggie Zed makes creatures that haunt — odd collections of bits of copper and porcelain, disconnected heads, animals that float and roll like the stuff of dreams, or maybe nightmares.

    The creatures that populate Zed’s world are not ones that we have seen before — they emerge from her imagination as random ideas. Human and animal figures collide with furniture or landscapes; rabbits sprout wheels or wings, while horses drown in collapsing scaffolding.

    FULL STORY »

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