PAST PRESS

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  • 2010 (18)
  • 2009 (25)
  • 2008 (13)


  • RECENT PRESS COVERAGE

    Halsey presents lecture and book signing with artist Kendall Messick | Mon. Nov. 1, 2010

    The Digital

    Kendall Messick is a photographer, filmmaker and installation artist who’s multi-media exhibition, “The Projectionist” showed at the Halsey Institute during the fall of 2007. A catalogue to accompany the exhibition was recently published under the same name for which Mark Sloan, Halsey Director and Senior Curator, has written an essay. During his lecture on November 10th, Messick will discuss the progression of “The Projectionist” project and its star Gordon Brinkle. The full-color book will be for sale after the lecture and Messick will sign copies. A print from “The Projectionist” exhibition is available to Halsey Patron Members through the Patron Print Program.

    FULL STORY »

    Bluesphere: Turning trash into the spiritual | Sun. Oct. 24, 2010

    The Post & Courier

    In Hindu and Buddhist traditions, a circle is never just a circle.

    It’s a shape that represents wholeness. It encompasses both the material and mystical realms, the world we share with others and the secret world of the mind.

    FULL STORY »

    Bluesphere sustainability exhibition series kicking into high gear | Sun. Oct. 24, 2010

    The Digital

    By now you may have heard of the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art’s project “Bluesphere,” a collaboration between several of Charleston’s art and higher learning organizations to draw attention to sustainability.

    From a movie screening, to discussions, to installations of disposed materials converted into art and structure, the project offers a number of things to see around town this month and next.

    FULL STORY »

    Bluesphere: portion of earth art expo in Marion Square | Sat. Oct. 23, 2010

    The Cosmopolitan Charlestonian

    If you’ve walked into Marion Square any time within the last two weeks, you may have noticed a new, strange, stick-like structure near the corner of Calhoun and King Streets. Similar to skinny Lincoln Logs, the spindly structure weaves itself into a canopy over the west corner pathway of the square. It popped up, seemingly overnight, and resembles a giant Jenga game. You’d almost not notice this piece of artwork since it blends so well with the scenery. But then evening falls, and the blue lights designed into the wooden slats shimmer a bit more brightly, easily catching the eyes of passers-by. Most people inquisically paused asking, “what is it,” as I stood there considering the structure and its representation.

    FULL STORY »

    Brazilian photographer digs into Rio’s shantytowns | Wed. Oct. 20, 2010

    Charleston City Paper

    Photographer Pedro Lobo believes the walls of a home say more about its inhabitants than a family portrait. “Walls can tell a lot about the history of a place,” he says. “Walls speak loudly.” But if the walls of your home are made of corrugated zinc, and your neighbors can look into the room where your children sleep, and your kitchen is lit from wires that criss-cross in front of your window, what does that say about you?

    FULL STORY »

    Bluesphere project reveals, through art, our impact on the environment, society | Sun. Oct. 10, 2010

    The Post & Courier

    Driving through the city, we might notice the construction projects, the garbage trucks, the landscapers trimming the hedges, the school buses passing by. We might see the stacked shipping containers at the port or the rows of truck bays behind the warehouse.

    We often may take for granted the paved roads and housing complexes, the discarded water bottles and stacks of flattened automobiles at the scrap yard or discarded cell phones, the SUVs, toy collections and individually packaged juice boxes at the grocery store.

    FULL STORY »

    Spirit in art: Artists explore African ritual ceremonies in exhibit at the Halsey | Sun. Jun. 6, 2010

    The Post & Courier

    The idea of bringing together the work of conceptual artist Nick Cave and photographer Phyllis Galembo is just the sort of inspirational brilliance one comes to expect from Halsey Institute director and out-of-the-box thinker Mark Sloan.

    Cave has been making “soundsuits” for about 15 years — garments made of a variety of materials and odd objects that rustle and click and hiss when set in motion. They are informed by West African ritual costumes but include references to Cave’s personal life and to aspects of American culture and history. They are stunning and spooky, strange and delightful, sacred and sacreligious at the same time.

    FULL STORY »

    Call and Response at the Halsey Gallery | Sun. Jun. 6, 2010

    52cannon.com

    Today I walked the four blocks from my house to the craft fair at the Music Farm, where I discovered a packed house of artists, crafters, and shoppers. There was something for everyone in the wide array of unique jewelry, vintage clothing and handi- crafts. Unfortunately, the craft fair was just for one day, but based on the response, my guess is that this event will reoccur. Afterward, I again battled the sweltering day, which felt like grandma’s attic, and walked over to the Halsey Institute, where I was incredibly impressed by the Call and Response show…

    FULL STORY »

    Nick Cave and Phyllis Galembo | Sat. Jun. 5, 2010

    Daily Serving

    Call and Response: Africa to America / The Art of Nick Cave and Phyllis Galembo recently opened at the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art in Charleston, South Carolina. The exhibition brings together the work of two American artists intrigued by the formation of cultural identity and individual experience within a society. Drawing inspiration from the rich ceremonial traditions and elaborate guises of African nations, Nick Cave and Phyllis Galembo create objects that are visually captivating and conceptually charged. Cave’s imaginative Soundsuits and Galembo’s photographic portraits of West African masqueraders prompt the viewer to regard the world in terms of connection and community.

    FULL STORY »

    Museum celebrates portraits | Fri. Apr. 30, 2010

    The Aiken Standard

    “The first time that I saw this remarkable array of photographs, I recognized a handful of them as people I actually knew – a few friends, some passing acquaintances, a half-dozen familiar faces. I was excited to find them. Recognizing somebody in a crowd of strangers always seems like some kind of good omen,” writes Josephine Humphreys about the latest temporary exhibition at the South Carolina State Museum.

    FULL STORY »

    Eye on Image-Making: Palmetto Portraits | Sat. Apr. 17, 2010

    Black Star Rising

    The results of a massive four-year photography project are on display through Jan. 9, 2011, at the South Carolina State Museum in Columbia. Called “Palmetto Portraits,” the exhibition features the work of 24 photographers who have created 275 color and black-and-white portraits of residents of the Palmetto State.

    FULL STORY »

    Celebrated curator returns to jury CofC exhibition | Wed. Mar. 31, 2010

    Charleston City Paper

    Mary Jane Jacob arrives at the airport from Chicago around noon. She’s in town for a weekend to jury the CofC School of the Art’s Young Contemporaries exhibition. She’ll grab some lunch, unpack her bag, then dig in to her task. But first she has a stop to make.

    “I have a thing at two,” says Jacob, a professor and executive director of exhibitions at the Art Institute of Chicago. “It’s at the Borough Houses.”

    FULL STORY »

    Iconoclastic Hilton Head Island artist serves as focus of new retrospective at Jepson | Fri. Feb. 26, 2010

    Savannah Morning News

    At her 800-square-foot home and studio on Hilton Head Island, Aldwyth spends hours leafing through catalogs, magazines and books, searching for images for her latest works of art.

    Her more ambitious collages, which offer surrealistic mash-ups of art history, technology and the natural world, can take as long as five years to complete. Originally from California, this 74-year-oldartist has lived on Hilton Head Island since 1979, quietly creating her iconoclastic collages and assemblages in relative seclusion from the mainstream art world.

    FULL STORY »

    Bill Carson and co. are onto something | Tue. Feb. 16, 2010

    Charleston City Paper

    Good conduct: The Opposite of a Train return from the road with confidence

    Local group The Opposite of a Train’s Bill Carson walked onto the stage at the Memminger Auditorium on a recent evening, wearing a vintage-style brown suit, thick black frames, and carrying a old six-string. He didn’t look the part of a traditional master conductor or academic concert music director. But then, the elaborate Groundhog Day Benefit Concert on Feb. 2 — a fundraiser for the CofC’s Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art — wasn’t exactly a traditional affair.

    Switching between acoustic and electric guitars and banjo, Carson stood with his left side to the audience as the program kicked up. With Ron Wiltrout to his right on a jazzy drum kit and various percussion gear, and Nathan Koci across the stage on brass, accordion, and Wurlitzer, Carson guided the music with simple glances, hand signals, and musical cues.

    FULL STORY »

    Eye opening photo exhibit at the Halsey Institute | Tue. Jan. 26, 2010

    The Columbia Examiner

    Aimed to shed light on two troubled African nations, the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art at Charleston College is currently showing the works of Jonathan Torgovnik in Intended Consequences: Rwandan Children Born of Rape and Heather McClintock in The Innocents: Casualties of the Civil War in Northern Uganda.

    FULL STORY »

    Halsey exhibit to shed light on two African nations | Thu. Jan. 21, 2010

    The Post & Courier

    The Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art at the College of Charleston School of the Arts presents the two related photography exhibitions: Jonathan Torgovnik, “Intended Consequences: Rwandan Children Born of Rape” and Heather McClintock, “The Innocents: Casualties of the Civil War in Northern Uganda.”

    FULL STORY »

    Latest Halsey exhibit opens at a pertinent time | Wed. Jan. 20, 2010

    Charleston City Paper

    The Haiti quake has been a nasty reminder that there are people in the world less fortunate than ourselves. The Haitians struggled to house and feed themselves long before last week’s disaster. They aren’t the only ones who make our lives seem excessive.

    FULL STORY »

    C of C taking arts to next level | Sat. Jan. 9, 2010

    The Post & Courier

    A $27.2 million price tag buys a princely amount of space — 71,000 square feet to be exact — but it’s what will be achieved within these spaces that will define the College of Charleston’s new Marion and Wayland H. Cato Jr. Center for the Arts.

    The college’s once-cramped School of the Arts celebrates its new building at Calhoun and St. Philip streets with a public unveiling from 1 to 4 p.m. today. The community is invited to explore all five floors of the Cato while savoring “mini-presentations” of music, theater, dance and other events. Special guests, including the Cato family, attended a private opening Friday night.

    FULL STORY »

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