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  • RECENT PRESS COVERAGE

    Aldwyth: Work v. / Work n. | Wed. Dec. 9, 2009

    Daily Serving

    The Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art (HICA) in Charleston, South Carolina has a long history of celebrating works by artists who exist on the fringe of the mainstream contemporary art world. For the inaugural exhibition of their new gallery space, Director and Senior Curator Mark Sloan is presenting a collection of collage and assemblage works, titled work v. / work n., from a rather unknown artist standing at the edge of her first major museum exhibition, at the ripe age of 74.

    FULL STORY »

    Halsey fundraiser lights up the sky | Thu. Nov. 12, 2009

    The Post & Courier

    If you haven’t been to the Halsey Institute for Contemporary Art to see its current exhibit, “Aldwyth: work v. / work n.: Collage and Assemblage 1991-2009,” just stop whatever you are doing and go there.

    You will be amazed. It’s probably the most professional exhibit I’ve seen in Charleston, and it’s in the Halsey Institute’s new building and installation space.

    FULL STORY »

    The Halsey unveils Aldwyth’s cabinet full of curiosities | Wed. Oct. 21, 2009

    Charleston City Paper

    If you’ve been downtown recently, you’ll have noticed some big, unblinking eyes watching you from posters and stickers. If you’re on the Halsey Institute’s mailing list, you’ve probably received an e-mail that promises you’ll see “an eyeful,” with a Benday-dotted orb attached. The searing image recurs in the work of the Hilton Head-based Aldwyth, an artist who will be the first to exhibit in the Halsey’s brand new gallery space. Ironically, this artist, whose watchful eyes seem to follow us nearly everywhere we go, has been toiling for years out of sight of the art world.

    FULL STORY »

    State of the Art:The Halsey Institute opens its new designed-for-the-future facility | Sat. Oct. 17, 2009

    Charleston Magazine

    “We could have a monster truck show in here!” laughs Mark Sloan, curator of the College of Charleston’s Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art, as he gazes around the cavernous hall that will soon serve as the gallery’s hub.

    Sloan may not be joking. In his 15 years steering the Halsey, he’s hosted everything from circus sideshows to a Japanese artist who sets her paintings on fire. With an estimated 3,300 square feet of display space and 13-foot ceilings in the new Marion and Wayland H. Cato Jr. Center for the Arts, the Halsey can finally host large-scale sculptures, paintings, and exhibitions. “It is a purpose-built, state-of-the-art facility designed with the anticipation of new technologies,” says Sloan. “We have the ability to respond creatively to any artist’s desires.”

    FULL STORY »

    INSIDE OUT | Wed. Oct. 7, 2009

    artnet.com

    Aldwyth, the single-named South Carolina artist now having her first solo museum show, a retrospective, is a voracious collector, scrupulous cataloguer, encyclopedic archivist, sly social commentator and corrective art-historian. In short, she is a consummate artist.

    Aldwyth resists the categories that others tend to put her into; although she dropped her first name in order to obscure her gender, she says she is not a feminist, and that her work is not political. She generally transcends the distinctions among genres, and avails herself of many traditions. Her work reflects influences from folk art and craft; obsessive outsider art; modernism, Dada and Surrealism; gender politics; and everything else going on in the world.

    FULL STORY »

    Everyday People—Palmetto Portraits IV runs the gamut from priests to roller girls | Wed. Sep. 16, 2009

    Charleston City Paper

    The life of a portrait photographer isn’t all brides, babies, and watching the birdie. The discipline encompasses many different styles, formats and focal points. But there’s one thing that all good portraits have in common — they capture the subject’s character in one frozen moment. In Palmetto Portraits IV, MUSC and the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art have teamed up to tell the stories of everyday people with a brand new collection of photographs.

    The project began as an imaginative way to brighten up the interiors of some of MUSC’s newest buildings. University President Ray Greenberg realized that he didn’t have to go the traditional route of putting up framed Monet posters. With the same amount of money, he could display original, local art instead. But he wasn’t sure how to put the idea into action.

    FULL STORY »

    Lesson in Survival: Palmetto Portraits at MUSC | Thu. Sep. 10, 2009

    The Post & Courier

    he Medical University of South Carolina, in partnership with the Halsey Institute, will be unveiling the fourth and final installment of the multiyear collaboration, Palmetto Portraits Project.

    The opening reception will take place 5-7 p.m. Sept. 16 in MUSC’s new James B. Edwards College of Dental Medicine, 29 Bee Street.

    FULL STORY »

    An Art Odyssey: The Halsey’s 16-year journey to build a home comes to an end | Wed. Sep. 9, 2009

    Charleston City Paper

    Passing the Albert Simons Center for the Arts on St. Philips Street has been a noisy, hazardous pursuit for the past two-and-a-half years. With one lane and sidewalk blocked off, pedestrians crowd the remaining thoroughfare and spill onto the street. Work has continued in earnest on a new wing since its foundations began to take shape in January 2007. The barriers and scaffolding around this new wing, named The Marion and Wayland H. Cato Jr. Center for the Arts, have become such a commonplace sight that they’re practically ignored by most people. Now those barriers are coming down and the School of the Arts has started to move furniture and resources into the five-story space.

    FULL STORY »

    A New Year, A New Life | Sun. Sep. 6, 2009

    Carolina Culture by Jeffrey Day

    This is the first time in 20 years I haven’t been looking at the coming arts season from inside a newspaper office. During the early 1990s, I started an annual arts guide at The State newspaper, called Arts Ahead, which provided full calendars, stories about what was coming up in the arts and tips for best enjoying and affording the arts. While I can’t do all that on this site (at least not yet) here are a few of my thoughts on what’s coming up.

    FULL STORY »

    CofC art gallery ready for, excited about new space on Calhoun | Sat. Aug. 29, 2009

    The Digital

    At long last the college’s new art building is nearly done, and that means the Halsey gallery gets to move into its new and much better space at 161 Calhoun Street in downtown Charleston.

    The official name of the new building is the “Marion and Wayland H. Cato Jr. Center for the Arts.”

    FULL STORY »

    Halsey Institute begins relocation | Sat. Aug. 29, 2009

    The Post & Courier

    The Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art at the College of Charleston on Friday began its relocation process into the new Marion and Wayland H. Cato Jr. Center for the Arts. The official opening date of the Cato is Oct. 23.

    The move from the Simons Center for the Arts to 161 Calhoun St. will offer heightened visibility and public access as well as greatly enlarged and improved facilities, said Mark Sloan, director and senior curator of the HICA.

    FULL STORY »

    Halsey Institute prepares for big move—Celebration complete with song and dance | Fri. Aug. 28, 2009

    Charleston City Paper

    The Halsey Institute for Contemporary Art at the College of Charleston has a new home. As of Aug. 28, they’ll be setting up shop in the Marion & Wayland H. Cato, Jr. Center for the Arts, located at 161 Calhoun St. downtown. The new location gives the institute the opportunity for tremendous growth and improvement with three galleries and a library/resource center.

    FULL STORY »

    FALL ARTS PREVIEW | Sun. Aug. 16, 2009

    Charleston City Paper

    Article 1

    Article 2

    FULL STORY »

    VArts Watch: A Weekly Cultural Policty Publication of Americans for the Arts | Wed. Aug. 12, 2009

    Americans for the Arts

    The Halsey Institute for Contemporary Art at the College of Charleston announces the award of an $80,000 program grant from the prestigious Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts for this year and next. Established in 1987 in accordance with Warhol’s will, the foundation’s objective is to foster innovative artistic expression and the creative processes that support artists and their work.

    FULL STORY »

    Halsey Institute for Contemporary Art receives major funding | Thu. Aug. 6, 2009

    The Post & Courier

    The Halsey Institute for Contemporary Art at the College of Charleston announces the award of an $80,000 program grant from the prestigious Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts for this year and next.

    Established in 1987 in accordance with Warhol’s will, the foundation’s objective is to foster innovative artistic expression and the creative processes that support artists and their work. The foundation values the contribution that organizations like the Halsey Institute make to artists, audiences, and to the community as a whole, explains Rebecca Silberman of the Halsey Institute.

    FULL STORY »

    Halsey Institute Receives Major Funding from Warhol Foundation | Wed. Jul. 15, 2009

    The Post & Courier

    The Halsey Institute for Contemporary Art at the College of Charleston announces the award of an $80,000 program grant from the prestigious Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts for 2009 and 2010.

    Established in 1987 in accordance with Warhol’s will, the foundation’s objective is to foster innovative artistic expression and the creative processes that support artists and their work. The foundation values the contribution that organizations like the Halsey Institute make to artists, audiences, and to the community as a whole.

    FULL STORY »

    Crowning glory in art: Exhibit a good reason to let your hair down | Wed. May. 27, 2009

    The Post & Courier

    “Go big, go bold, or go bald.”

    This was the ongoing statement for “Hair on Fire,” the current hair exhibit at the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art at the College of Charleston.

    Visitors to the opening were urged to style their hair in the most outrageous ways possible, so as to “blend in” with the artwork. One of the artists, Caryl Burtner, even set up an ongoing “clipping station” where visitors could cut off a piece of their hair and add it to her collection. Talk about letting your hair down.

    FULL STORY »

    Hair on Fire | Thu. May. 21, 2009

    Carolina Culture by Jeffrey Day

    “Hair on Fire” brings together some artists with a Charleston connection (Loren Schwerd taught at the college for several years and Caryl Burtner showed her collection of toothbrushes and other items at the college a decade ago) as well as others from across the country. They’re all women and they all make art of, or closely connected to, hair.

    Making art from hair isn’t new and to prove it the gallery has a display of historical hair art borrowed from the Charleston Museum dating back to 1750.

    FULL STORY »

    The Halsey Institute explores the question of hair: Good Hair Day | Wed. May. 20, 2009

    Charleston City Paper

    In the most scientific terms, hair is just protein filaments that grow outward from follicles deep within the skin. It spans most of the body’s surface area, proliferates most visibly from our scalps, and serves a number of biological purposes, most notably heat regulation.

    Why, then, have these strands of keratin remained such a subject of intense aesthetic, societal, and mythological fascination over the course of human history? 

    FULL STORY »

    Solid skills and bursts of color in this year’s Young Contemporaries | Wed. Apr. 22, 2009

    Charleston City Paper

    Every year, the Halsey surrenders its walls to the CofC’s Studio Art Department. Any current student is eligible to submit work, and the results always reflect a variety of styles and working methods.

    Juror Brian Rutenberg is an alumnus and a celebrated painter now based in New York. He is adept at capturing moods with abstract landscapes in lush, deep colors, so it’s no surprise he’s chosen some striking oil paintings for this diverse and entertaining show.

    FULL STORY »

    Young Contemporaries Exhibit features competing student artists | Thu. Apr. 9, 2009

    George Street Observer

    Students and faculty filled the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art Thursday night, April 2, for the opening of “Young Contemporaries” the Halsey’s annual juried student exhibition. The event showcases the work of C of C studio art students, hand-selected by C of C alumnus and New York City artist Brian Rutenburg.

    “I don’t like to compare the “Young Contemporaries” shows from year to year, but I can say I think this is among the strongest in my 15 years here,”said Halsey director Mark Sloan.

    FULL STORY »

    War on Terror: Inside/Out | Thu. Feb. 12, 2009

    Daily Serving

    Photographs from Christopher Sims and Stacy Pearsall turn the War on Terror: Inside/Out, as if showing us its seams. Sims documents American-made Iraqi and Afghan villages, used to train soldiers in North Carolina and Louisiana, in his series Home Fronts: The Pretend Villages of Talatha and Braggistan. Pearsall, a military combat photographer since age 17, presents the facts of her experience, daily life that is dark, but captured with elegance and expression, and deeply humanistic. We are allowed an extended gaze into these otherwise restricted worlds. Curator Mark Sloan at College of Charleston’s Halsey Institute has met his goal “to plumb the ironies and contrasts for all I could get.”

    FULL STORY »

    Photos from the Front – Cover Story! | Wed. Jan. 28, 2009

    Charleston City Paper

    Stacy Pearsall has never been good with words. What she saw in Iraq during two tours only makes them harder to come by. She knows what John McCain meant by leaving “with honor,” but feels Vietnam has little bearing on the War on Terror.

    We sent volunteers to Iraq, for one thing, who didn’t know who the enemy was. Her friend Donny lost his head to a sniper. Her friend Katie lost most of her right hand to one. Soldiers feared their throats would be slit in their sleep. Food was often poisoned. Pearsall herself was wounded twice in combat, once while carrying a man to safety.

    FULL STORY »

    Photographers look at ‘War on Terror’ | Sun. Jan. 25, 2009

    The Post & Courier

    Stacy Pearsall photographs a soldier sitting on a cot, reflecting on a lethal firefight that killed some of his comrades earlier that day. Eight thousand miles away, Christopher Sims snaps a picture of an actor dressed as an Iraqi insurgent in the backwoods of Louisiana.

    The two separate viewpoints highlighted by Pearsall and Sims will be showcased in the “War on Terror” art exhibition at the College of Charleston’s Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art.

    FULL STORY »

    Halsey Contrasts Two Realities from War Front | Thu. Jan. 22, 2009

    George Street Observer

    C of C’s Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art bustled with patrons Friday night, Jan. 23, for the opening of War on Terror: Inside/Out. A collection of photographs by Christopher Sims and Stacy Pearsall, the exhibit documents two contrasting realities of the present War on Terror.

    The first floor of the gallery showcases the work of Duke University professor Christopher Sims. As spectators made the first round through his photographs, they expressed shock and surprise at the surreal war images of guts coiling from stomachs and artificially red blood on the ground. Whether they read the artist statement or came to the conclusion themselves, it did not take long for the onlookers to deduce that the images were not in fact from the Middle Eastern warfront.

    FULL STORY »

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