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  • 2008 (13)


  • RECENT PRESS COVERAGE

    Silver Moon party pics | Mon. Nov. 17, 2008

    Charleston Magazine Party Scene Blog

    Images of all the pretty party people featured on the Charleston Magazine Blog.

    FULL STORY »

    Silver Moon HICA Membership Event | Wed. Nov. 12, 2008

    Charleston City Paper

    The Halsey Institute’s annual fund-raising party, the Silver Moon Bash, is a membership event, but don’t let that stop you from going—become a member right at the event for as little as $15. A small price to pay to support one of the city’s premier contemporary art galleries and to enjoy a fun party to boot. Once you’ve signed your name on that dotted line and become a patron of the arts, you’ll get to check out the Halsey’s latest exhibit, Mend: Love, Life, and Loss. The V-Tones will provide music, Ted’s Butcherblock will bring the heavy hors d’oeuvres, and the Wine Shop will keep everyone hydrated…

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    Embroidered Truth: Mend is a modern use of old-fashioned threads | Wed. Nov. 12, 2008

    Charleston City Paper

    Some art shows are thrown together, others are carefully woven. Curated by Mark Sloan, director of the Halsey Institute, Mend is held fast by a seam symbolizing the fragility of life in general and the female body in particular.

    The show’s focal point is an installation called “Pentagram of Loss.” It’s an attempt by artist Pinky/MM Bass to come to terms with the deaths of five close friends and relatives in five years. She uses the five sides of her pentagram to mark each person’s passing.

    FULL STORY »

    Mend: love, life, & loss | Tue. Nov. 4, 2008

    Daily Serving

    Mend: love, life, & loss, featuring ten nationally recognized fiber artists, opened at the College of Charleston’s Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art on Friday, October 24. Curator Mark Sloan has brought together works substantiated by a variety of non-traditional materials, such as hair, thread, fabric, paper, and plastic, many of which are marginalized by their use as craft supplies or in historically female trades. The hand crafting of these objects is essential to their meaning, and many address the body itself, examining its interior mysteriousness and the cultural assembly of form. Stitching, used as a meticulous and meditative process, reveals the rich meaning of “mend”. These artists use their works as a means of healing, but also examine or subvert the objects and concepts that they’re fixing up. Decoration becomes conceptual.

    FULL STORY »

    Halsey Takes New Direction with ‘Mend’ | Tue. Oct. 28, 2008

    George Street Observer

    The Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art teamed with spectators on Friday night, with the opening of “Mend: love, life, and loss.” A collaborative exhibition of 10 nationally recognized artists, “Mend”seeks to examine the duality of breaking and healing, of losing and finding that transcends the human experience. With the help of faculty and students, Mark Sloan, director of the Halsey Institute and curator of “Mend,” juxtaposes 10 distinct artistic perspectives.

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    ‘Pentagram’ opens Halsey exhibition | Sun. Oct. 19, 2008

    The Post & Courier

    Five nude figures covered in white clay dust will surround artist Pinky/MMBass as she sits on the floor crocheting a large work with threads stretching to the five figures, three females and two males.

    The choreography, accompanied by cellist Wade Davis, will be part of the 20-minute multimedia performance “Pentagram of Loss,” celebrating Friday’s opening of the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art’s exhibition, “Mend: Love, Life & Loss,” at the College of Charleston.

    FULL STORY »

    Halsey Institute shows Award-winning documentary | Thu. Oct. 9, 2008

    The Post & Courier

    Having screened in more than 100 film festivals on five continents, capturing 40 awards in the process, producer-director Adrian Belic’s the documentary “Beyond the Call” is a chronicle of adventure with a purpose.

    It is the story of Ed Artis, James Laws and Walt Ratterman, three middle-aged men who transport desperately needed food and medicine into some of the world’s most imposing places, including the front lines of war zones.

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    Discarded items turned into exhibits at Halsey | Sun. Sep. 28, 2008

    The Post & Courier

    The upstairs of the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art resembles a consignment shop – an unusually dreamy, otherworldly consignment shop.

    Clothing is meticulously folded and stacked, the layers of jeans, T-shirts, pants and polos rising and falling like waves.

    FULL STORY »

    Jarod Charzewski and Loul Samater | Fri. Sep. 19, 2008

    Daily Serving

    Currently on view at the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art in Charleston, South Carolina are two new installations by artists Jarod Charzewski and Loul Samater.

    Occupying nearly the entire second floor of the gallery space is Scarp, an installation by Jarod Charzewski comprised of what appears to be thousands of neatly folded items of clothing. The carefully organized mass of clothing replicates a geological formation with exposed strata and reveals a synthetic and fabricated history.

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    Halsey Exhibition Reveals The Naked Truth | Fri. Sep. 12, 2008

    George Street Observer

    “Is it all clothes?”

    The question buzzed between students, faculty and art aficionados on the second floor of the Halsey Institute Sunday night.

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    Faculty exhibit in the party mood | Sun. Aug. 31, 2008

    The Post & Courier

    Glitter, balloons, party hats. Is there a party going on at the College of Charleston’s Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art?

    In fact, no. It’s “Diving Dunce,” an exhibition by faculty member Loul Samater, whose work is derived from memories of growing up in such places as Saudi Arabia, where she was born, and learning the customs of this country. She has arranged party decor in a setting that she hopes creates a tension for viewers, leaving them to question whether the party is over, or whether it has yet to begin, thus challenging viewers to consider whether they are participants or observers.

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    Emotional Architecture: Azimuth of Fissure | Wed. May. 28, 2008

    Charleston City Paper

    Now on display at the Halsey Institute at the College of Charleston is Emotional Architecture: Azimuth of Fissure. This exhibit arrives from the hands of Calin Dan, a Romanian-born artist who uses photography and video to stream ideas of people and place into hypnotic glimpses of the past and present. The gallery’s first floor appears sparse, but the two displayed pieces pack enough curiosity to tickle your brain and tweak your instinct. A long, photographic scroll the color of old newspapers hangs from the second floor rafter. The photo shows a man in a hat standing beside a terrific split in the earth. The fissure resulted from Charleston’s last significant earthquake, in 1886. The fissure runs the length of the photograph and nearly touches the gallery floor.

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    Pint-Sized Picasso: Richard McMahan’s incredible shrinking masterwork | Mon. May. 19, 2008

    Charleston City Paper

    Richard McMahan began amassing his Mini Museum of art 18 years ago. Since then he has painted nearly 1,100 distinctive tiny replicas of celebrated artworks. His style usually mimics that of a particular artist. Jackson Pollock’s precise paint splatters or a pop artist’s use of enlarged pixels, for instance, but McMahan leaves traces of his own personality as well.

    Most of McMahan’s paintings are the size of a baseball card. The smallest could hide beneath a stamp, while the largest, his version of DaVinci’s “Last Supper,” is the size of a DVD case.

    FULL STORY »

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